Psychology Online – How To Use Hypnosis http://howtousehypnosis.com/ Tue, 06 Jul 2021 07:58:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://howtousehypnosis.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Psychology Online – How To Use Hypnosis http://howtousehypnosis.com/ 32 32 Four UTSA students win Fulbright International Travel Awards | UTSA today | UTSA https://howtousehypnosis.com/four-utsa-students-win-fulbright-international-travel-awards-utsa-today-utsa/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/four-utsa-students-win-fulbright-international-travel-awards-utsa-today-utsa/#respond Tue, 06 Jul 2021 07:34:09 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/four-utsa-students-win-fulbright-international-travel-awards-utsa-today-utsa/ JULY 6, 2021 – Four UTSA undergraduate students have received Fulbright US Student Program scholarships to travel to Germany, Spain and Belarus in 2022. This year’s UTSA winners are Amber chin, Psychology and English; Arlae Gamez Luna, Political science; Monica Guerrero, interdisciplinary study with EC-12 special school diploma; and Taylor Helmcamp, World events. In addition […]]]>


JULY 6, 2021 – Four UTSA undergraduate students have received Fulbright US Student Program scholarships to travel to Germany, Spain and Belarus in 2022. This year’s UTSA winners are Amber chin, Psychology and English; Arlae Gamez Luna, Political science; Monica Guerrero, interdisciplinary study with EC-12 special school diploma; and Taylor Helmcamp, World events.

In addition to the winners, seven of the eight UTSA students who applied were recommended for the second round of the competition and three were named as deputies: Affiong Akpaninyang, Mariam Kerfai and Montana Meeker.

The Fulbright program is sponsored by the US State Department and is the flagship program for international educational exchanges. The program aims to improve mutual cultural understanding among peoples by sending a diverse group of US citizens abroad each year. More than 2,000 students each year are funded to travel abroad to graduate, do independent research, and teach English abroad.

You can find out more about the UTSA’s 2021 Fulbright Prize winners here:



Amber chin
Germany (research)

As a graduate of the Top Scholar Program and the UTSA Honors College, Chin will travel to Germany to conduct research on social movements and political online discourses at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, where researchers focus on developing innovative methods for evaluating social – Have specialized in media data. There will be general elections in Germany next year, and Chin is looking forward to seeing the election year in the country.

“I am very fortunate to be able to participate in a program like Fulbright and I hope to be able to use this time to really connect with my host community in Rostock,” said Chin. “It is exciting to think that I will completely immerse myself in the region in which my research is located and that I can work with so many great mentors through the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research.”

Chin was a research associate for a psychology professor at UTSA Michael Baumann in the Group Dynamics Lab and as a research assistant at a professor of political science Bryan Gervais in the UTSA Digital Politics Studio. In her second year at UTSA, she conducted research in Germany at the Georg Elias Müller Institute for Psychology at the University of Göttingen, which helped guide her research focus for the Fulbright grant application. She also enrolled in German courses at UTSA to prepare for the program.



Arlae Gamez Luna
Germany (study)

Gamez Luna is a graduate of the Terry Scholar Program and UTSA Honors College. She also participated in the McNair Scholar Program and is an IES Pathways Fellow of the Institute of Education Sciences and a UTSA Mellon Pathways Fellow. Gamez Luna majored in political science and did research with a sociology professor Harriet Romo on refugees and migrants from the northern triangle countries Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador.

She also worked with a professor of political science Sharon Navarro, who was her mentor for her thesis “Immigrant Latina Women: A look Into Texas Political Rhetoric”. Gamez Luna herself emigrated to the United States from Mexico after serving 10 years as a nun for the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and Mary.

In Germany, Gamez Luna will complete an MA in international social work with refugees and migrants at the University of Würzburg-Schweinfurt. By combining her previous research and personal experience, she would like to learn more about the phenomenon of migration and get to know the international structures, actors and organizations that find suitable solutions for migrants and refugees.

Before applying for the Fulbright program, Gamez Luna was also named a 2019 Gilman Scholarship Holder to study abroad in Germany. However, since the global pandemic interrupted international travel, she took online courses at the Humboldt University in Berlin.

Erik Oviedo, the lead coordinator of the Terry Scholars program, shared how much Gamez Luna has made in the Terry Scholars and Honors College programs since arriving at UTSA.

“Arlae was an amazing person who embodied the Terry Scholar pillars of science, leadership, service and community,” said Oviedo. “Since she first arrived on campus, it was obvious that she was as real as she had come. Always anxious to improve herself and those around her, she tried to challenge and surpass anything that led her to leave her mark here at UTSA. We are very proud of her and are excited to see what she will achieve in the near future. “

Upon his return to the United States, Gamez Luna plans to earn a Ph.D. in international comparative education, where she will continue her community engagement and seek ways to influence local, national and international educational policy.



Monica Guerrero
Spain (English Teaching Assistant)

Guerrero is a 2021 graduate of the University of Education and Human Development, where she studied interdisciplinary studies with a focus on special education. Like Gamez Luna, she was also named a Gilman Scholar in 2020 to study abroad in Spain. While the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted her plans, she applied to the Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Program, which offers an internship in the same La Rioja region as her study abroad.

Guerrero grew up in Mexico and traveled every day over the Brownsville-Matamoros Express International Bridge to the school in Texas she attended. In her application, she described how she had a hard time getting used to because she couldn’t speak English. Her experience motivates her to become a teacher and ultimately pursue a career in consulting. She also said that her mother’s work as a teacher inspired her own level of education.

“Seeing my mother exceed her challenges, raise four children during her Masters degree, and exceed expectations of creating a better future for my sisters and me has helped me fulfill my teaching skills and desire to become someone better “Said Guerreroer said.

In Spain, she will pass this experience on to her English students and share with them her challenges as a language learner. She also hopes to learn how the educational system in Spain differs from that in the United States.



Taylor Helmcamp
Belarus (English Teacher Assistant)

Helmcamp is a graduate of the Top Scholar Program and UTSA Honors College 2021. She studied Global Affairs with minor subjects in Russian and Linguistics. As a Bachelor, she studied abroad in four UTSA programs in Mexico, Germany and Switzerland, Russia and Italy. She participated in programs related to immigration, diplomacy, intensive language studies and mutual cultural understanding. After participating in these short-term programs, she spent a semester in Italy as part of the UTSA Urbino program.

As a student at Honors College, she also participated in a number of special programs, including Students and Startups, an online ESL teacher program, and the Archer Fellowship, where she interned with the US State Department. This combination of UTSA programming combined with her language studies made her particularly competitive for the Fulbright program.

Helmcamp applied for the English Teaching Assistant Program in Belarus to deepen her understanding of Eastern Europe beyond Russia. When planning a future career in diplomacy and energy policy, Belarus made sense as a destination because of its position as an energy hub between Russia and the rest of Europe. In addition to Fulbright, Helmcamp was also accepted into the joint UT Austin School of Law / MA in Russian and Eastern European Studies Program with a scholarship. She plans to specialize in international energy law in order to eventually work as a US sales representative on energy contracts in Eastern Europe.



Growing number of Fulbright receivers for UTSA

In the past two years, more UTSA students have received Fulbright Awards than ever before. This year’s results were the UTSA’s highest annual return when four students won awards in 2011. Despite the pandemic that has affected international travel, almost the same number of UTSA students have applied as last year. In 2020 UTSA had three award winners: Ana-Sofia Gonzalez (Colombia), Myat May (Malaysia) and David Diaz (Taiwan). While these students’ programs have been delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Fulbright has made arrangements for students to continue scholarships in 2022 or years to come.

Andrew Chapman, Director of the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards and UTSA Fulbright Program Advisor, noted that UTSA’s continued success with Fulbright will result from a combination of campus support for the program to increase application numbers and students throughout the process support.

“Right now, there are about 10 students applying for Fulbright each year, but I’d love to see 50 apply,” said Chapman. “The Fulbright US student program fits our campus perfectly and gives students of all backgrounds access to international travel, even if they don’t have extensive travel experience. Programming in research, study and teaching can help advance the future goals of students, regardless of the course or university. The program was also fantastic for bringing students and faculty together to explore pressing global issues and engaging with communities around the world. “

When students fill out a Fulbright application, faculty advises them during a campus interview. This will help them prepare a competitive application that includes a personal statement and a grant proposal. This year the UTSA’s Fulbright Interview Committee consisted of lecturers and staff from across the university: Whitney Chappell, modern languages ​​and literatures; Devon Donahue-Bergeler, modern languages ​​and literatures; Seok Kang, Communication; Kristen Lindahl, bilingual-bicultural studies; and Maren Mitchell, bilingual-bicultural studies; participated to interview students and provide feedback



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People in Business: July 5, 2021 issue https://howtousehypnosis.com/people-in-business-july-5-2021-issue/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/people-in-business-july-5-2021-issue/#respond Mon, 05 Jul 2021 09:44:37 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/people-in-business-july-5-2021-issue/ American International College announces the following leadership team promotions and additions. Nicolle Cestero has been promoted to Chief Operating Officer and Executive Vice President and retains her title of Chief of Staff. Cestero joined the college in 2011 as deputy vice president of human resources and has assumed increasing responsibility and scope. Cestero will be […]]]>


American International College announces the following leadership team promotions and additions.

Nicolle Cestero has been promoted to Chief Operating Officer and Executive Vice President and retains her title of Chief of Staff. Cestero joined the college in 2011 as deputy vice president of human resources and has assumed increasing responsibility and scope.

Cestero will be responsible for the day-to-day running of the College and will continue to act as an advisor to the President. Cestero will oversee the college’s legal affairs and support presidential and institutional initiatives to ensure project deadlines are met and desired results are achieved.

Cestero holds a master’s degree in organizational organizational psychology from the University of West Florida and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Mount Holyoke College. She is a certified specialist for human resources and has been appointed as a specialist by the company for personnel management. Cestero is currently working on a master’s degree in business administration at the AIC.

Velmer S. Burton Jr. joins the college as executive vice president of academic affairs. He will oversee bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the School of Business, Arts and Sciences, School of Education and School of Health Sciences.

Most recently, he was Vice Chancellor of University Strategy and Performance and Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. He also served as the university’s chief academic officer, overseeing 164 academic programs supported by 500 full-time faculty.

Burton received a certificate from Harvard University, Graduate School of Education, 2004 Harvard Seminar for New Presidents, a Ph.D. in higher education management from the University of Pennsylvania in 2003, a Ph.D. in Sociology and Masters and Bachelors degrees in criminal justice from the University of Cincinnati in 1991, 1986 and 1985, with more than 60 articles and publications in crime and justice.

Jennifer McDonough joins the college as vice president of institutional development. McDonough brings nearly 40 years of funding experience, including institutional leadership roles and philanthropic advisory services.

As a former executive associate at Bentz Whaley Flessner, a national and international fundraising consultancy and service company, McDonough has worked for a variety of private and public higher education institutions across the country, including American International.

She holds a master’s degree in multidisciplinary studies majoring in art management and a bachelor’s degree in art education, both from the State University of New York College in Buffalo.

Matthew Scott has been Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Studies since July 2020. He will expand his remit to include the Title IX Coordinator. With this addition, Scott will be the designated officer of AIC with primary responsibility for coordinating Title IX compliance, including leading Title IX activities; Advice, training and further education.

Scott joined the college in 2013 as Director of Residence Life and Assistant Title IX Coordinator. Scott holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Springfield College and a master’s degree in university administration from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Louis R. Izzi joins the college as vice president of athletics and comes from the University of Bridgeport, where he served as vice president of athletics and enrollment management since 2019. While at Bridgeport, Izzi was responsible for the strategic planning, leadership, development, operations and human resource management of the university’s NCAA Division II athletics program.

Prior to joining the University of Bridgeport, Izzi was the director of athletics at New England College in Henniker, New Hampshire, a Division III institution with 18 varsity, club, and junior varsity teams, as well as in-school and recreational programs. Prior to that, he was Associate Director of Athletics Administration at Johnson & Wales University in Rhode Island for 17 years, while also serving as the men’s ice hockey coach at Johnson & Wales and Nichols College for 15 years. Izzi holds a master’s degree in sports administration from Canisius College in Buffalo, New York and a bachelor’s degree in English from Providence College.

Jessica Chapin was promoted to sports director. She joined the college in 2014 as a compliance coordinator. Among her responsibilities, Chapin is responsible for the day-to-day administration of the Athletics Department, including overseeing compliance with NCAA Division I and Division II rules and bylaws, retention, financial support, and recruiting new students in collaboration with offices across campus. She is the Assistant Coordinator of Title IX for Athletics.

Chapin currently serves on the NCAA’s Regional Women’s Volleyball Advisory Committee and was appointed to the NCAA’s Violation Committee for a four-year term in May. She currently serves on the Executive Committee of the Atlantic Hockey Association and the National Intercollegiate Rugby Association. Chapin received a master’s degree in sports administration from Springfield College and a bachelor’s degree from Brandeis University in psychology and health sciences, society and politics.

Michael Eriquezzo has been promoted to Director of Marketing and Communications. He will oversee all aspects of institutional digital and traditional marketing, the web, and public relations for the college, including the semi-annual Lucent magazine, which has a circulation of more than 30,000 alumni. Eriquezzo joined Go Graphix College in East Longmeadow as Art Director and Senior Designer in 2017, where he served as Project Manager and Creative Director and the Children’s Study Home as External Communications Manager. He received his bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

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Hampshire Power Corp. was recently welcomed Patrick Quinlan as a technical account manager.

Quinlan holds a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin and has over 30 years of experience in renewable energy and energy efficiency. Quinlan will be responsible for supporting and growing the Hampshire Power Renewable Energy Certificate products and services, engaging installers and homeowners alike.

Quinlan comes from Solablock Corp. and Black Island Wind Turbines, which he co-founded, to Hampshire Power. Quinlan previously served as a Congressional Technology Fellow, White House Technology Fellow, and Senior Analyst at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Quinlan was a human resources engineer at AeroVironment for the famous inventor Paul MacCready. He holds multiple patents and now has three projects at the Smithsonian Institution.

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Called Friendly’s Restaurants and BRIX Holdings David Ellis as Chief Marketing Officer for all brands and promoted Sylvia Becker as Vice President of Marketing at Friendly’s Restaurants. Both people bring more than 20 years of marketing experience to their roles.

Ellis will lead brand strategy, marketing, public relations and digital initiatives for Friendly’s Restaurants, as well as for all BRIX Holdings brands: Orange Leaf; Smoothie factory; Red mango; Soup salad; Red brick pizza; and humble donuts. He will also lead the development of loyalty programs, online ordering and virtual brands.

Becker will develop integrated marketing plans to support brand strategy that leverages the use of traditional and digital media, loyalty programs, off-premise, social media engagement, influencer partnerships and public relations to drive overall brand reputation, awareness and traffic via the Friendly’s Boost Restaurant System.

Prior to joining Friendly’s Restaurants and BRIX Holdings, Ellis was the Chief Marketing Officer for Uncle Julio’s, responsible for launching a new advertising campaign, developing new products, introducing third-party delivery and growing the loyalty program. He was also vice president of marketing for O’Charley’s Restaurants and held executive positions at KFC and Darden Restaurants for both Olive Garden and Red Lobster, including brand management, national advertising and menu strategy.

Becker has been with Friendly’s for eight years, previously as Senior Director Media Services. Prior to joining the Friendly team, Becker served as Senior Director of Media Services at Johnny Rockets and Marketing Manager at McDonald’s restaurants across New England and Albany, New York.

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Cornerstone Bank celebrates Jennifer Anderson for # 5 on Banker & Tradesman’s list of Top Lenders in Central and Western Massachusetts. Anderson, vice president and mortgage loan officer at Cornerstone Bank, made 155 mortgage loans to help secure her place on the list.

A longtime employee of Cornerstone Bank, Anderson has 17 years of experience as a mortgage loan officer. She lives in Spencer and is a graduate of Babson College, where she studied finance.



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The psychological fear of our death https://howtousehypnosis.com/the-psychological-fear-of-our-death/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/the-psychological-fear-of-our-death/#respond Sun, 04 Jul 2021 04:38:47 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/the-psychological-fear-of-our-death/ I saw my father die. He was 89. I also saw my father-in-law die. In fact, my father-in-law died in my hospital. He was 86 years old. He was released home that day. In the morning he took his bath alone. Disguised himself in elegant clothes. Then lay down in a hospital bed and died. […]]]>


I saw my father die. He was 89. I also saw my father-in-law die. In fact, my father-in-law died in my hospital. He was 86 years old. He was released home that day. In the morning he took his bath alone. Disguised himself in elegant clothes. Then lay down in a hospital bed and died. He had applied for and received a haircut the day before. He was calm, cool, and collected. His death was peaceful and he was a man of peace.

In my more than 35 years of medical work before my retirement. Before I died, I was engaged in medical research on human psychology. That is the state of mind of a dying person. That is, when someone knows that he or she is going to die. Will he panic. He will be calm. Will he shake things up, get tantrums or philosophically rationalize approaching death?

I know I’ve never died before, but after observing, observing, and researching the state of mind of dying people, I’ve come to two conclusions. I’ll get to that later. Know that women live longer on average than men in most countries, except in India, where men live longer. Nobody is quite sure why women live longer. It can be a factor in their physical condition and state of mind. Alternatively, it can be the result of the different types of work men and women tend to do.

Impending death leaves one with two psychological phases of the mind. 1. The anxious stage. 2. The sad stage. According to Socrates’ definitions, fear is a journey while grief is an arrival. Can you understand the philosophy behind the two claims?

The anxiety phase – is a very worrying phase. It could even lead to suicide. This stage can manifest itself as panic attacks, excessive panting, and palpitations. Inability to grapple with the thought of dying, especially when it is linked to a painful death. You may experience difficulty breathing and a feeling of suffocation.

You may feel dizzy, unsteady, and fainting. The person has a bizarre feeling of rapid heart constriction and syncope. You may experience tremors, tremors, and shaking hands. This stage can also manifest itself with excessive sweating and suffocation. You may experience nausea, stomach pain, or diarrhea. Feelings of unreality, strangeness or distance from the environment can also arise.

Numbness or tingling sensations may follow the disease depending on the associated pathology. You may experience redness or chills. Chest pain or general discomfort. The fear of dying can also lead to an anxiety neurosis. It could be the nagging fear of going crazy or losing your mind or control.

The sad phase – manifests itself with the realization of what must be. Man accepts his fate with equanimity and rationalizes it with clever jumps or floating animation. The person calmly begins to put the finishing touches to their ultimate demise. Wills are drawn up, reviewed, updated or revised during this phase. Engaging in spirituality could also help soothe angry feelings of an imminent end to life.

Yes, we all have to die someday, but how psychologically we are prepared to accept the inevitable. Always seek medical guidance.

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CLASS LEADER: OA best of year to major in psychology; Salutatorin will study engineering | Lifestyles https://howtousehypnosis.com/class-leader-oa-best-of-year-to-major-in-psychology-salutatorin-will-study-engineering-lifestyles/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/class-leader-oa-best-of-year-to-major-in-psychology-salutatorin-will-study-engineering-lifestyles/#respond Fri, 02 Jul 2021 06:37:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/class-leader-oa-best-of-year-to-major-in-psychology-salutatorin-will-study-engineering-lifestyles/ Karly Smith, daughter of Raymond and Kristin Smith, is best in the Oakfield Alabama class of 2021. Karly is a valued member of the cross-country skiing, basketball and track and field teams. She was involved in the band and choir and shared her talents in the drama club. She was a member of the National […]]]>


Karly Smith, daughter of Raymond and Kristin Smith, is best in the Oakfield Alabama class of 2021.

Karly is a valued member of the cross-country skiing, basketball and track and field teams. She was involved in the band and choir and shared her talents in the drama club. She was a member of the National Honor Society, Math Team, Link Crew, and Future Farmers of America. She is also the chairperson of her class.

Karly is an active member of the Genesee County 4-H Boots N Bling Horse Club.

Karly has been awarded the New York Land Contractors of America Scholarship, Section V Girls’ Basketball Scholarship, and Muriel Pies Memorial Scholarship.

Karly will attend Roberts Wesleyan College, where she is studying psychology, to pursue a career as a crisis intervention psychologist.

Salutatorian will be studying engineering

Oakfield-Alabama Central School Class of 2021 salutatorian Zachary Hall is the son of Robert and Laura Hall.

Zach shines as a participant in the school’s swim team and is particularly proud of his participation in the cross-country, indoor and athletics teams.

In addition to being a member of the band, Zach is also a member of the Jazz Band, Choir, Swing Choir and most importantly, honored to be a part of the All-County Chorus. He is also an invaluable member of the National Honor Society.

Zach played an active role in tidying up the ward by taking part in foliage gatherings and singing Christmas carols at nursing homes with Grace Baptist Church. He enjoyed studying the Bible.

Zach received the President’s Scholarship and will attend the Rochester Institute of Technology, where he will study engineering and continue his passion for running on the college’s cross country and track teams.



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Online courses keep kids quiet and slow. How can the situation be improved? – Online Khabar English News https://howtousehypnosis.com/online-courses-keep-kids-quiet-and-slow-how-can-the-situation-be-improved-online-khabar-english-news/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/online-courses-keep-kids-quiet-and-slow-how-can-the-situation-be-improved-online-khabar-english-news/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 03:55:49 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/online-courses-keep-kids-quiet-and-slow-how-can-the-situation-be-improved-online-khabar-english-news/ Avishek has been attending online courses at a well-known school in Kathmandu for a year. For the eight-year-old, the first few days were fun because he enjoyed sitting in front of a computer like his older sister and taking lessons. But as the months went by, he stopped enjoying classes and began to feel the […]]]>


Avishek has been attending online courses at a well-known school in Kathmandu for a year. For the eight-year-old, the first few days were fun because he enjoyed sitting in front of a computer like his older sister and taking lessons. But as the months went by, he stopped enjoying classes and began to feel the fatigue of spending so much time in front of the screen. Over time, he also found it quite difficult to understand what he was being taught, and that gave his parents cause for concern.

“He’s never been a smart student, but he’s not been that bad in the past,” says his mother. “Perhaps it is time to rethink how online education for children works.”

The government has asked schools to stay closed for a second year and teach online. They were also asked to take online tests as SEE candidates will be re-assessed based on their performance in their internal exams.

To ensure that children are not deprived of their right to education, the government is introducing a policy to help children learn through alternative means such as radio, television and online applications. However, psychologists say that online education has a negative impact on children, mainly due to one-way communication and their mental health.

The sound of silence

Representative picture

Prem Budhathoki from Jwagal studies in the second standard. His mother Sneha Tamang says she hardly ever sees the seven-year-old talking to his teachers. After realizing this, Tamang began to watch the class to see if only her child was not speaking. To her surprise, the whole class was silent while the teacher taught.

At first she felt that it might be a rule not to stop the teachers during class. But now she realizes that this is not a rule and believes teachers should encourage students to speak and ask questions that they want answers to.

“How can teachers expect seven-year-olds to understand without asking questions? I think schools need to rethink their online courses, ”says Tamang.

She says that her son has changed a lot over the past year. He was active and lively as he loved playing outside on his bike. But recently that has all changed.

“He just sits at home and watches TV or makes phone calls,” says Tamang.

This example proves psychologists right. Because children spend seven to eight hours of uninterrupted online classes with five to ten minutes between classes, they seem tired. Also, the fact that they couldn’t meet their friends in person made school boring for many as many parents complained that their child had become lazy.

Mental health effects

Representative picture

Psychologists say they received calls from parents asking them why their child doesn’t want to have conversations with others and doesn’t understand simple things that are taught in class. Many parents have even complained that their child is disinterested and unfocused.

Many schools have asked the children to listen to the teacher and only ask questions at the end of the lecture, also in writing on apps such as Zoom. Even homework needs to be sent online. According to psychologist Dr. Pushpa Adhikari negatively affects the child’s mental health.

“They ask the students to mute the microphone if it gets too loud, but if only the teacher is speaking things can get monotonous, which can be exhausting in the long run,” says Dr. Adhikari. “You really need to look at what can be done to curb this burnout in the students.”

Another reason students don’t speak to teachers is because they can now record everything the teacher teaches. Since they can also take screenshots of the notes, they have the feeling that they no longer need to talk to the teachers. Psychologists say that concentration problems are natural because it is difficult to stare at a screen eight hours a day, as children are inevitably distracted from the smallest of things when they are disinterested.

What can schools do?

Photo: Pixabay

Education experts and psychologists say schools need to change the way they conduct classes online, adding that classes need to be made more engaging. Dr. Adhikari says schools need to find a new way of integrating hands-on learning.

“You need to develop a new structure and a new curriculum,” she says.

Only if the curriculum is taught in a more creative and interesting way will children learn and have fun with it, she says, because the current structure only promotes a culture of attack.

“Personally, I think in a 40-minute class the teacher should teach 20 minutes and the rest of the time should be spent talking to the students about their day and their problems,” says Dr. Adhikari.

She also encourages teachers to give students more group work or team activities than homework in order to improve their teamwork skills.

Child psychologist Madhu Bishal Khanal says the government did not consider a child’s mental health in preparing the course structures. That coupled with online courses has drastically hampered children’s mental psyche, he says.

“Times have changed and with it we need to change educational practices. Children today are learning what children learned in the 90s, although many things have changed. We use technology, but we don’t know how to use it to reform education, ”says Khanal.



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ETSU Ballad Health Strong BRAIN Institute Advances Education and Research | ACCENT https://howtousehypnosis.com/etsu-ballad-health-strong-brain-institute-advances-education-and-research-accent/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/etsu-ballad-health-strong-brain-institute-advances-education-and-research-accent/#respond Mon, 28 Jun 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/etsu-ballad-health-strong-brain-institute-advances-education-and-research-accent/ JOHNSON CITY – Over the past year, East Tennessee State University / Ballad Health Strong BRAIN Institute directors have worked to develop infrastructure, provide education and training, and expand research with the goal of increasing trauma-informed citizens and workers everywhere promote the region. The Strong BRAIN (Building Resilience through ACEs-Informed Networking) Institute was founded by […]]]>


JOHNSON CITY – Over the past year, East Tennessee State University / Ballad Health Strong BRAIN Institute directors have worked to develop infrastructure, provide education and training, and expand research with the goal of increasing trauma-informed citizens and workers everywhere promote the region.

The Strong BRAIN (Building Resilience through ACEs-Informed Networking) Institute was founded by Ballad Health and ETSU in 2020 to advance awareness and research of ACEs or unwanted childhood experiences that can have a profound impact on an individual’s mental and physical health Life.

The Strong BRAIN Institute is headed by founding director Dr. Wallace E. Dixon Jr., Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at ETSU’s College of Arts and Sciences, and recently brought on two full-time research fellows for months.

Dr. Rochelle Hentges, assistant professor, focuses on children’s outcomes in the context of early adversity, especially within the family, a statement said. She examines some of the risk and resistance factors that either encourage higher risk or act as a buffer in adverse environments. She is also interested in the developmental processes and mechanisms that explain why early adversity affects child development, as well as the intergenerational transmission of maternal mental health and maternal ACEs to child mental health and wellbeing.

Hentges joined ETSU from the University of Calgary’s Department of Psychology, where she completed a postdoctoral fellowship. She was previously a postdoctoral fellow in psychology at the University of Pittsburgh after completing her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Rochester. Hentges has received numerous awards for her research and has been published in journals such as Child Development, Development and Psychopathology, Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, British Journal of Educational Psychology, and others. She also has a book chapter on “Developmental Perspectives of Parenthood” to be published in the upcoming Oxford Handbook on Evolutionary Psychology and Parenting.

Benjamin Schönberg, Research Services Coordinator, is a public health professional with 10 years of experience in health advice, direct service, program evaluation, care coordination, project management, analysis and more. Previously, he was a program coordinator and professional instructor at Aspire Youth and Family and worked with the juvenile justice system in Western North Carolina. He also worked as a health and disease prevention specialist at the Robert Wood Johnson Outpatient Wellness Centers in Scotch Plains, New Jersey. He holds a Masters of Public Health from the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Public Health and the Mountain Area Health Education Center.

A bevy of experts was formed to serve as contributors to the Strong BRAIN Institute. This includes faculty members from all academic colleges at ETSU – College of Arts and Sciences, College of Business and Technology, Clemmer College, College of Clinical and Rehabilitative Health Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, College of Nursing, Gatton College of Pharmacy and College of Public Health – together with independent consultants and HR specialists. In addition to participating in the institute’s strategic planning, these individuals also participate in teams focused on curriculum development and looking for ways to move ETSU into a trauma-informed institution.

Dixon and other members of the institute have already started delivering trauma awareness and resilience training across the community, the statement said. They have given presentations to numerous regional government agencies and civic groups, and run virtual “town halls” for both the ETSU community and the public, focusing on resilience issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In addition to the Strong BRAIN Institute contributors, a community advisory board was formed with representatives from a variety of sectors, such as: B. Local Government, K-12 Education, Higher Education, Business, Law / Justice, Legislation, Faith, Health Care, and others. Members of the institute are working on the development of new training modules specially tailored to these sectors.

Dixon says that one of the biggest things the Strong BRAIN Institute has worked on over the past year is an interdisciplinary scholarship project led by Dr. Diana Morelen from the Department of Psychology is to develop training in trauma for the entire Gatton College of Pharmacy. With the support of Dr. Debbie Byrd, dean of the college, the Strong BRAIN Institute staff work with administrators, faculty, staff and students.

“We want to do the science – not just the training – and we are trying to assess whether it matters that we did the training,” Dixon said in the press release. “Is something changing? Feel better? We’ll be doing assessments throughout the summer, and maybe the feedback we’re getting from the College of Pharmacy can give us some insight into trauma information across the university. “

Dixon said that while the Department of Counseling and Human Services at ETSU’s Clemmer College has a minor in trauma and resilience, he wants to develop a curriculum that engages and engages students in a variety of fields of study.

“We want to develop opportunities in the general education curriculum that students in all majors could be interested in,” said Dixon. “Students may think, ‘Why should I want to learn about trauma? That sounds terrible. ‘ So we have to think about how we can design the program in such a way that it also addresses courses that are far outside the traditional trauma-interested disciplines such as psychology, counseling or social work. What will make a math student interested in this? How do we win a physics or engineering degree? “

In addition, the Strong BRAIN Institute staff is reviewing the provisions of the recent American Rescue Plan Act to see if the law provides for federal funding opportunities that the institute would be qualified to qualify for, and physical room renovations are being made to house and provide room for staff for activities.

Dixon identified a room near the Psychology Department in Rogers-Stout Hall for this purpose. The renovation itself is done according to trauma-informed principles, including the creation of bright rooms, natural tones, and themed wall coverings that encourage calm and relaxation.

“Introduction to ACEs, Use of Trauma-Informed Approaches, and Fostering Resilience,” an online professional development course suitable for individuals in a variety of fields, is currently available through the ETSU Ballad Health Strong BRAIN Institute and the Office of Continuing Medical Education from ETSU available from Quillen College of Medicine.

Open to all, this course, which is open to all, provides an overview of ACEs and teaches how trauma and resilience-informed approaches can promote better health and wellbeing for individuals, workplaces, and the wider community. It is an undergraduate degree and a requirement for future training opportunities in areas such as K-12 and higher education, police, healthcare, and more. To learn more or to sign up, visit https://bit.ly/3vwagCM.



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Rob Martinez is the new director of Griffin Technology Academies – Times-Herald https://howtousehypnosis.com/rob-martinez-is-the-new-director-of-griffin-technology-academies-times-herald/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/rob-martinez-is-the-new-director-of-griffin-technology-academies-times-herald/#respond Sat, 26 Jun 2021 22:38:20 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/rob-martinez-is-the-new-director-of-griffin-technology-academies-times-herald/ The Griffin Technology Academies (GTA) board of directors announced its new superintendent on Thursday evening with the unanimous ratification of a two-year contract for Dr. The Mare Island Technology Academy in Vallejo is part of the GTA. Martinez joins GTA after serving the wider educational community for 35 years, including 32 in Solano County. He […]]]>


The Griffin Technology Academies (GTA) board of directors announced its new superintendent on Thursday evening with the unanimous ratification of a two-year contract for Dr. The Mare Island Technology Academy in Vallejo is part of the GTA.

Martinez joins GTA after serving the wider educational community for 35 years, including 32 in Solano County.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in education, both from the University of California, Davis, and a PhD in educational leadership and management with a major in human resources from Drexel University. He lives in Benicia with his wife Nancy.

Martinez will take up his new position on July 1st. He replaces Dr. David Yoshihara, whose last working day is June 30th.

“I am thrilled to have this opportunity to serve the students at Griffin Technology Academies,” said Martinez. “Each of our students deserves the best we can offer, exceptional teaching in a safe, responsive, and emotionally supportive environment. Every opportunity and access to exceptional teaching and guidance that we can offer will exceed any of your accomplishments in achieving your personal goals.

“I look forward to working with our staff, board of directors, families, students and all of our stakeholders to ensure we are focused on meeting the needs of our students and all of our enrolled students at our Vallejo locations Providing excellent levels of education is our main initiative, ”continued Martinez. “Each of our students, our future leaders, deserve the best that we can offer.”

Recently, GTA’s board of directors enlisted the services of CharterSearch, based in Solano County, under the direction of Bob Hampton, to lead the executive search.

“I look forward to seeing Dr. Martinez becomes part of the GTA family, ”said Hampton.

CEO Debbie Lamb felt the same way.

“I believe his leadership skills and experience in education will prove extremely beneficial to our organization,” said Lamb.



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Shannon Pinkston Obituary (2021) – Missoula, MT https://howtousehypnosis.com/shannon-pinkston-obituary-2021-missoula-mt/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/shannon-pinkston-obituary-2021-missoula-mt/#respond Fri, 25 Jun 2021 07:45:41 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/shannon-pinkston-obituary-2021-missoula-mt/ Shannon Leah Pinkston Shannon Leah Pinkston, 54, died unexpectedly of natural causes at home in Missoula on June 21, 2021. Shannon was born on December 6, 1966 in Akron, Ohio, to Ray and Donna (Bump) Pinkston. She graduated from Tallmadge High School, continued her education at the College of Wooster, and eventually earned a PhD […]]]>


Shannon Leah Pinkston

Shannon Leah Pinkston, 54, died unexpectedly of natural causes at home in Missoula on June 21, 2021. Shannon was born on December 6, 1966 in Akron, Ohio, to Ray and Donna (Bump) Pinkston. She graduated from Tallmadge High School, continued her education at the College of Wooster, and eventually earned a PhD in Philosophy (in Psychology) from the University of Montana.

Shannon was a dedicated member of the Hellgate Band Parents for four years and has served on the board of the Missoula International Friendship Program since 2013. In addition to her passion for hosting international students, she was a talented baker – and true to character, Shannon donated all of the proceeds from her bakery business to charity.

Shannon was passionate about the outdoors, especially hiking and hunting morels. She enjoyed running (all over Missoula) and participated in triathlons. Shannon lived a full and active life, often working on a project or outside in her yard.

Most of all, Shannon was a devoted and caring mother to her son and daughter – participating in their activities, spending summer days at the lake, traveling the world and providing a caring home. Parenthood was their top priority.

Shannon was a loving mother, daughter, sister and friend who will be missed dearly by everyone. She is survived by her children Callan Ravesloot and Grace Ravesloot; Mother, Donna Pinkston; Brother Matthew Pinkston; Dog / running partner, Eddy; Extended family; and a lot of friends. Her father, Ray Pinkston, preceded her in death.

A memorial service will take place on Saturday, June 26, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. in the Garden City Funeral Home. Online condolences can be posted on gardencityfh.com.

Instead of flowers, please donate to the Jeannette Rankin Peace Center.

Published by Missoulian on June 25, 2021.



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Interim Dean selected for Clinton School of Public Service https://howtousehypnosis.com/interim-dean-selected-for-clinton-school-of-public-service/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/interim-dean-selected-for-clinton-school-of-public-service/#respond Wed, 23 Jun 2021 21:42:54 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/interim-dean-selected-for-clinton-school-of-public-service/ The academic dean of the University of Arkansas’ Clinton School of Public Service has been named the school’s interim dean. Susan Hoffpauir, professor and academic dean at the Clinton School, will lead the master’s program until a new dean is appointed, UA System President Donald Bobbitt said Wednesday. “DR. Hoffpauir has a broad range of […]]]>


The academic dean of the University of Arkansas’ Clinton School of Public Service has been named the school’s interim dean.

Susan Hoffpauir, professor and academic dean at the Clinton School, will lead the master’s program until a new dean is appointed, UA System President Donald Bobbitt said Wednesday.

“DR. Hoffpauir has a broad range of experience and an impressive list of academic and leadership achievements throughout her career and is a natural fit to lead this unique institution while our quest is complete,” said Bobbitt in a statement.

She replaces James L. “Skip” Rutherford III, who announced his resignation in September 2020. His resignation will take effect on June 30th. Rutherford has directed the UA Clinton School since 2006.

Hoffpauir – who once served as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Academic Policy at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock – joined the Clinton School in 2011.

School officials said her accomplishments include directing a curriculum review and revision, conducting the school’s first self-paced study, and writing the 10-year program review required by the Arkansas Division of Higher Education.

She helped plan and develop the new online program for Executive Masters of Public Service, which began in March 2018, and expanded the Clinton School’s community partnerships in Arkansas nationally and internationally, the UA System Office said in a press release.

Clinton School students work with partners on projects that are tied to curriculum requirements. During Hoffpauir’s tenure, the school said, the Office of Field Services built a political and curriculum infrastructure that supports partnerships with 44 international host organizations on six continents.

At UALR, Hoffpauir directed the institution’s regional accreditation review by the North Central Association’s Higher Learning Commission, and she designed and established the Social Work Bachelor’s degree, which received full accreditation in 2005.

Hoffpauir holds a bachelor’s degree in social welfare from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. She earned a Masters in Social Work from Michigan State University at East Lansing and later received a Masters in Developmental Psychology and a Ph.D. in Social Work and Social Sciences from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.



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Food is mood https://howtousehypnosis.com/food-is-mood/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/food-is-mood/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 14:40:29 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/food-is-mood/ As a neuropsychologist, I am most often used to treat my patients’ brains head but when planning treatment, I am increasingly drawn to the function of the brain in theirs Intestines. The enteric nervous system (ENS) is made up of the lining of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon and comprises an estimated 500 […]]]>


As a neuropsychologist, I am most often used to treat my patients’ brains head but when planning treatment, I am increasingly drawn to the function of the brain in theirs Intestines. The enteric nervous system (ENS) is made up of the lining of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon and comprises an estimated 500 million neurons and 40 neurotransmitters that are directly related to mood and cognition. The latest research suggests that 95% of the available serotonin and 50% of the bioavailable dopamine is produced in the ENS.1.2

The relationship between inflammation and ENS function is simple: a high intake of saturated and trans fats, red meat, and refined starches and sugars promotes inflammation, and a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids, natural antioxidants, fruits, vegetables and whole grains is cereal reduces inflammation. For the same reasons, the same diet caters to patients with chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and conditions such as depression, which research has also characterized as chronic, mild inflammatory disease.3 Indeed, research suggests that increased bacterial translocation in the gut as a result of our modern, stressful lifestyle and inflammatory diet can be a major contributor to the onset of clinical depression and further exacerbate inflammation in diseases such as RA. In essence, the scientific literature confirms that we are what we eat, or that we feel as good as we eat.

The use of food to manipulate mood is not new. In fact, Hippocrates is known to have studied the healing powers of food.4th The Hippocratic oath contains this clause: “I will use dietary measures, for the benefit of the sick, that correspond to my abilities and my judgment …” This study concluded that eating foods high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids was directly related to improvements in mood, anxiety, and impulse control.5 Importantly, this study also found that consuming good quality chocolate also improved mood and alertness.

So how can you harness the interventional health benefits of food to support your RA clients and promote better mood and wellbeing? Talk about food. Suggest foods high in protein or omega-3s to help fight depression and fresh fruits and vegetables to improve cognitive function. And don’t forget to mention that chocolate lifts your spirits too. While the conversation about food can be a tense conversation, however, as with any difficult conversation about behavior change, one of the best techniques is a motivational conversation where the goal is to plant an idea and then reinforce it. Nobody wants to be asked to eat differently or more healthily, but maybe when they come up with the idea.

Avoid the obvious temptation to step on a soap box and “prescribe” a healthy diet and instead start the conversation with open-ended questions about your patient’s current diet and lifestyle. For example, say “Tell me about what and how you eat”. Next, recognize your patient’s strengths with affirmations that make them more willing to share. For example, say, “It’s great that you are prioritizing your health and eating more vegetables.” Finally, summarize their answers and reinforce any ambivalence you hear. For example, say, “You started prioritizing your health by drinking water and eating three servings of fruit, but it sounds like you are making other dietary changes as well.”

Then, as with planting seeds, you can expect slow and steady progress. Make sure you check in regularly and celebrate your winnings. Invite them to co-investigate this new intervention (behavior change) and ask them to track their mood and RA symptoms every day. If you recognize eating disorders like binge eating or diets that are overly restrictive, you can turn to a list of local eating disorders specialists or nutritionists, but you have the training to start that conversation and use this powerful intervention. You can also better relate to the intensity of their struggle if you also prioritize diet – always easier said than done.

Eating Disorders Specialists:

National eating disorders

AN AD

Academy for Eating Disorders

ANAD treatment directory

Nutritionists:

Eat properly

NANP

National Board of Physician Nutrition Specialists

Mia Baumgartner is a Masters in Forensic Psychology at the University of Denver with an interest in Neuropsychology and Somatic Therapy. In her first year, Baumgartner did research on traumatic brain injuries in the criminal justice system. She wants to work in prison reform or teach yoga in prisons.

References:

1) Strandwitz P. (2018). Neurotransmitter modulation by the gut microbiota. Brain Research, 1693 (Pt B), 128-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2018.03.015

2) Gershon MD, Tack J. The Serotonin Signaling System: From Basic Understanding to Drug Development for Functional GI Disorders. Gastroenterology. 2007; 132: 397-414.

3) Berk, M., Williams, LJ, Jacka, FN, O’Neil, A., Pasco, JA, Moylan, S., Allen, NB, Stuart, AL, Hayley, AC, Byrne, ML and Maes, M . (2013). So depression is an inflammatory disease, but where does the inflammation come from? BMC Medicine, 11.200. https://doi.org/10.1186/1741-7015-11-200

4) PRASAD, C .. Food, mood, and health: a neurobiological perspective. Braz J Med Biol Res [online]. 1998, Volume 31, No. 12 [cited2021-05-05], Pp. 1517-1527. Available under: . ISSN 1414-431X.https: //doi.org/10.1590/S0100-879X1998001200002.

5) AlAmmar, WA, Albeesh, FH & Khattab, RY Food and mood: the corresponding effect. Curr Nutr Rep 9, 296-308 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13668-020-00331-3



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