Mental Health Awareness – How To Use Hypnosis http://howtousehypnosis.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 09:33:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://howtousehypnosis.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Mental Health Awareness – How To Use Hypnosis http://howtousehypnosis.com/ 32 32 Norwich City: Stephen Fry delivers mental health message https://howtousehypnosis.com/norwich-city-stephen-fry-delivers-mental-health-message/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 09:33:23 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/norwich-city-stephen-fry-delivers-mental-health-message/ Released: 10:31 am June 28, 2022 Updated: 10:33 am June 28, 2022 Norwich City fan Stephen Fry has teamed up with the Canaries to deliver a strong mental health message. The ex-City director recounted a video released on the club’s official channels on Tuesday morning, which highlighted the problem across East Anglia and urged anyone […]]]>

Released:
10:31 am June 28, 2022



Updated:
10:33 am June 28, 2022

Norwich City fan Stephen Fry has teamed up with the Canaries to deliver a strong mental health message.

The ex-City director recounted a video released on the club’s official channels on Tuesday morning, which highlighted the problem across East Anglia and urged anyone suffering from mental health problems to seek help.

Fry spoke as a City fan and in his capacity as President of Mind, the mental health charity. The 2 minute: 33 second clip revealed statistics showing 518 people took their own lives in East Anglia in a year, with the average age of the club’s season ticket holders being among those most at risk.

City’s social channels ran a teaser on Monday afternoon that read ‘Not Another Kit Reveal’, with Fry starting the video by confirming City’s new kit will be revealed on Thursday.

The club’s campaign, launched in partnership with Norfolk and Waveney Mind, also includes touching individual stories from people directly affected by mental health issues.

“Demand for our services increases each year as more people seek support for their mental health,” said Sonja Chilvers, chief operating officer at Norfolk and Waveney Mind.

“As the leading mental health charity in Norfolk and Waveney, we support thousands of local people each year through our wide range of services and support programs.

“Our goal is to make sure no one is struggling alone with poor mental health, and campaigns like this allow us to reach more people and encourage them to talk about how they’re feeling, speak up and ask for help .

“When you are dealing with a mental health issue or supporting someone who is struggling, access to the right information and support is crucial. From prevention support to crisis support, wherever you are on your mental health journey, we are here for you.”

Norwich City senior marketing manager Holly Leech, who helped create the campaign, added Official site of the Canary Islands. “This campaign represents something bigger than our kit launch and something bigger than the club.

“Even though mental health is much more talked about today, there are still so many who suffer in silence. The goal of this campaign was to show people where to go in times of crisis and to show our community how to help those around them when they need support.

“This is an issue close to my heart and with the support of many people at the club we have been able to create something that shows how we can help increase the fight for mental health.”

Norfolk and Waveney Minds Information and support page includes crisis resources, case studies, hotline contact information, and support and service guides.

The clubs Community Sports Foundation already has an initiative called Run For Me to support the mental health and wellbeing of people in Norfolk.

The sessions provide participants with a friendly support group that offers them relief from everyday stress and is a great way to stay physically healthy and fit.

Starting in September, the “Play for Me” foundation will start, which follows a similar model and uses football as a physical activity.

If you or someone you know is in urgent need of help, come visit us mind.co.uk for emergency advice.

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It’s time US small businesses took care of mental health | US Small Business https://howtousehypnosis.com/its-time-us-small-businesses-took-care-of-mental-health-us-small-business/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 10:01:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/its-time-us-small-businesses-took-care-of-mental-health-us-small-business/ RMost recently the Society of Human Resources Executives questioned Around 3,100 HR executives on the benefits their companies provide, and of course the obvious ones – health care, retirement and paid time off – topped the list. But here’s something that should get your attention if you’re a small business owner: More than 91% of […]]]>

RMost recently the Society of Human Resources Executives questioned Around 3,100 HR executives on the benefits their companies provide, and of course the obvious ones – health care, retirement and paid time off – topped the list. But here’s something that should get your attention if you’re a small business owner: More than 91% of respondents also said their business provides some type of mental health benefits, up from 86% in 2018 and significantly is higher than any level in the last ten years.

That’s not difficult to understand. Thanks to the pandemic and other stresses of modern life, countless Americans are suffering from mental health issues. Awareness of the issue has risen in recent years, thanks in part to public announcements by celebrities from tennis star Naomi Osaka to gymnast Simone Biles. Survey after survey reminds employers that their employees are increasingly stressed and the more attention must be paid for their mental health problems.

And yet many of my clients – small business owners – still don’t seem to get the message. So I’ll tell you about a recent court case that should catch your attention.

According to numerous reports, including This one here Last March, legal website JD Supra ordered a Kentucky company to pay an employee $450,000 for wrongfully terminating him after he suffered two panic attacks at work. The employee, who suffers from an anxiety disorder, was triggered by a birthday party thrown for him and left work abruptly. He was later fired because he “concerned other employees were afraid for their safety when the employee was having the panic attacks.”

After a two-day trial, a jury ruled in favor of the worker, stating that he had a defined disability and was able to perform essential duties of his job, but suffered an adverse employment complaint as a result of his disability. The award included both past and future lost wages and benefits, as well as pain and agony.

Why did I show this to my customers? Because my company serves hundreds of small businesses and most of them fit the typical employer-owned business demographics. They are family-run, B2B, industrial or service-oriented, and generally still under the control of someone over 50, which is the average age of US small business owners Small business administration.

This is a generation – my generation – that was raised to ignore mental health issues. These are things that are best dealt with privately and not at work. Mental illness is not like a physical illness, our parents told us. It’s just a thing in your head. Turn it off. Get over it.

But that attitude is changing rapidly and significantly.

Thanks to the pandemic and the growing number of younger workers who are openly discussing these issues with their friends and on social media, mental health is no longer a stigma or an issue to be brushed aside or covered up. Smart employers recognize that the provision of mental health benefits needs to be a core part of their overall rewards packages in order to attract and retain the best employees in these times of job shortages.

“Stress at work is a fact of life for every employee”, writes Employment attorney Howard Levitt on the Kentucky case. He says these issues “can politicize the workplace and divert attention from work” and that “aside from operational issues, workplace stressors can also lead to serious employer liability if not addressed quickly and appropriately.”

But some of my older clients still don’t get it. They see mental health issues as a weakness, a character flaw, an excuse from a younger generation that is “softer” than their own. I realize that with some of these customers I will not change their minds. But they need to understand that ignoring this trend will result in new talent being lost and may even lead some of their existing employees to seek other opportunities with companies that are more aware of their situation.

I try to tell them that with mixed results. But now I have to try something new: the Kentucky case. Because I know one thing is for sure: the threat of having to spend $500,000 because they’re not doing what they’re supposed to be doing can be the motivation some business owners need.

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Michelle Williams joins Salesforce.org and LL Cool J’s Rock The Bells to champion mental health https://howtousehypnosis.com/michelle-williams-joins-salesforce-org-and-ll-cool-js-rock-the-bells-to-champion-mental-health/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 14:18:14 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/michelle-williams-joins-salesforce-org-and-ll-cool-js-rock-the-bells-to-champion-mental-health/ As the engine of culture, hip-hop has the power to transform conversation and focus attention on important issues. Rock The Bells, founded by LL COOL J, has partnered with Salesforce.org to advocate for voices in hip-hop and break the stigma surrounding mental health. Mental Health Campaign According to a press release shared with AfroTech, the […]]]>

As the engine of culture, hip-hop has the power to transform conversation and focus attention on important issues.

Rock The Bells, founded by LL COOL J, has partnered with Salesforce.org to advocate for voices in hip-hop and break the stigma surrounding mental health.

Mental Health Campaign

According to a press release shared with AfroTech, the campaign aims to inspire action and drive progress towards the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal #3: Health and Wellbeing.

In addition, the wellness campaign will amplify the voices of nonprofit leaders, luminaries and some of them hip hop most prominent names and storytellers, backed by the power of Technology.

The program was announced during the panel discussion, “The Mental Health Crisis is an Everyone Crisis: The Role of Brand + Culture,” moderated by Madison Slinker, Head of Brand Marketing at Salesforce.org, at the 2022 Cannes Lion International Festival of Creativity. Panelists included James Cuthbert, President of Rock The Bells, and Grammy-winning artist Michelle Williams.

“In 1973, when hip-hop culture was born, you think of the level of oppression and all the things that were going on. Hip-hop was born out of a need for black people to have a voice, whether it be Grandmaster Flash, Queen Latifah, or Self Destruction,” Cuthbert told AfroTech exclusively. “Well, fast forward to today, with the amount of people speaking honestly about suicide and how they’re feeling, mental health issues in hip hop music as a whole have increased. It’s a no-brainer for Rock The Bells to join Salesforce, who have great partners and diverse resources for people, and Michelle Williams, who has dedicated much of her life to helping people navigate the mental health space. “

“Whether it’s a song’s lyrics, a photograph, or the creativity expressed in a music video, hip-hop is the dominant catalyst for cultural ripples and social change,” said Cristina Jones, Salesforce.org’s chief engagement officer, according to one press release . “Working with Rock The Bells to combine the power of hip-hop with the power of Salesforce.org’s mission to create positive social impact through technology will hopefully stimulate and expand conversations about the importance of our collective mental well-being. This partnership will shine a light on the communities, artists and individuals who are at the forefront of creating spaces, conversations and resources around mental wellbeing and continue to prove that it takes unprecedented collaboration to solve unprecedented challenges .”

Michelle Williams on mental health

As for Williams, the jump on board required no hesitation. The singer-songwriter understood the importance of mental health while facing her struggles, starting in seventh grade. Williams shared with AfroTech that the therapy has been helpful in overcoming trauma and through her healing journey, she has inspired those around her to start their own.

“I keep my long-term therapist appointment. I tell people that therapy isn’t just about dealing with pain. I talk to my therapist about dating and I talk about certain transitions. Trauma is something that uproots you, or it’s an experience you don’t know how to deal with. So I continue my therapy. I have close friends who say, ‘Girl, you inspired me to process things.’ So I know I’m in my calling. I love it when I’m done speaking and knowing that someone has hope or a smile on their face or doesn’t feel like there’s anything wrong with them.”

By 2013, Williams had become a mental health advocate and was openly sharing her story with larger audiences.

Over time, she has found that conversations about mental health have become more normal.

“The discussion of mental health in 2013 is different than it was in 2022,” she said. “So I’m proud and excited that it’s being talked about, it’s being shared more and people are doing it through their platforms or their music. I find that people are more transparent and vulnerable. So we smash the stigma away daily before it’s erased.”

The partnership

Williams’ desires will be amplified throughout the partnership as Salesforce.org will work with its partners and global customer network nonprofit organizations Make mental health and wellness resources more accessible to the public.

Additionally, with each program launched, Salesforce.org’s mental health experts will play a role in providing educational resources.

Partnering with Rock The Bells to increase mental health awareness through digital content on their respective platforms, additional panels will be held at events including Cannes Lions, Rock The Bells Festival in Queens, NY, and Salesforce Tower in NY, among others Other.

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Therapy on the Go: Patients turn to Lyf Support for mental health care https://howtousehypnosis.com/therapy-on-the-go-patients-turn-to-lyf-support-for-mental-health-care/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 07:25:10 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/therapy-on-the-go-patients-turn-to-lyf-support-for-mental-health-care/ Would you like to take a step into the world of therapy but don’t know where to start? This online remote counseling and psychiatric service provides help and guidance at your fingertips. Despite the increased interest in raising mental health awareness, there are still a number of barriers preventing those who need treatment from getting […]]]>

Would you like to take a step into the world of therapy but don’t know where to start? This online remote counseling and psychiatric service provides help and guidance at your fingertips.

Despite the increased interest in raising mental health awareness, there are still a number of barriers preventing those who need treatment from getting it. Many people still struggle to find therapy sessions that meet their needs, whether because of long waiting lists, exorbitant fees, or scheduling conflicts, but these new services are making it easier than ever to receive mental health care.

Lyf Support, an Australia-based mental health services app, has changed the way mental health therapy works. It strives to provide the best and most accessible online service to all people around the world.

If you’re nervous about getting out there or not sure what kind of support you need, this is a wonderful place to start.

Lyf Support’s chat-based therapy might be a good fit for you if you’re having trouble expressing yourself verbally. Instead of having to speak in an in-person or video therapy session, communicate through text. There is no need to be presentable or worry about being overheard.

You can speak to a certified therapist right away, when it suits you best and when you need it most.

Sessions are 30 minutes each and can be extended if necessary. You don’t have to wait hours or even days for a game. Get quick answers, support and instructions. Pay for sessions as needed and create your own schedule for ongoing instruction.

If you or someone you know is struggling with their mental health, you can find support and resources at https://lyfsupport.app

Lyf support
https://lyfsupport.app
(+613) 9663 6935

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More young people have mental health problems https://howtousehypnosis.com/more-young-people-have-mental-health-problems/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 22:13:23 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/more-young-people-have-mental-health-problems/ Each mass shooting in the past three months has sparked fear and anxiety among young people, a Miami-Dade psychiatric nurse says of the children he sees. “The numbers are staggering,” said Eddy Molin, manager of a psychiatric nurse at Jackson Health System in Miami. “In the last two months we have seen an increase in […]]]>

Each mass shooting in the past three months has sparked fear and anxiety among young people, a Miami-Dade psychiatric nurse says of the children he sees.

“The numbers are staggering,” said Eddy Molin, manager of a psychiatric nurse at Jackson Health System in Miami.

“In the last two months we have seen an increase in hospital admissions. Most children come with anxiety and disruptive and impulse control behaviors. Of course we can try to connect these to some of the events that happened in the country, like shootings,” he said.

Eddy Molin is Nurse Manager at Jackson Health System in Miami.

In a world where everything is far from right, young people often react with anger and defiance. Empathy, not punishment, is the way to get them. Molin said parents should be pre-emptive when it comes to identifying things that are going on with their child.

“Adolescent brains are still developing. We can’t expect them to argue or deal with it the way an adult would. If you have a child who used to be in all the activities and has started isolating, we need to pay attention and try to figure out why,” Molin said.

Deteriorating personal hygiene, staying in bed longer, withdrawing from family and friends are signs of problems.

Teenage suicides on the rise

“The suicide rate among 15-19 year olds was almost 60% higher in 2020 than in 2007,” said Beth Jarosz, deputy director of KidsData. Worse, Jarosz said the suicide rate for 10- to 14-year-olds in 2020 nearly tripled from 2007.

Jarosz crunches numbers. She said teen suicides in California increased 33% from 2010 to 2020. New York’s course changed little. Rates in Texas rose nearly 80%. Florida prices rose more than 100%. Jarosz said white and Asian teens have the highest suicide rates in Florida; Black and Latino prices are about the same.

Beth Jarosz is the US Programs and Associate Director for KidsData at the Population Reference Bureau (PRB). She joined PRB in 2013. Her focus is on subnational demographic and socioeconomic trends, estimates and projections, and trends in child welfare.

“Prices for black youth are rising fast. They have doubled in the last two decades. Most of that increase has only happened in the last decade,” Jarosz said.

Indigenous youth are at high risk. This also applies to transgender youth. Children who have been traumatized, made homeless, or bullied are more likely to commit suicide. Teens who know someone who has committed suicide or died of a drug overdose are often depressed and need help. Too often they don’t understand.

“There is an incredible unmet need for mental health services,” Jarosz said.

One in six young people aged 3 to 17 has a mental health problem such as ADHD, anxiety, behavioral problems or depression. Yet only half have undergone mental health treatment in the past year.

what can be done

“We can destigmatize and expand access to mental health care,” Jarosz said.

She said states should look to places like New York, where there hasn’t been an increase in youth suicide, and emulate what works. She said reducing childhood adversity would help.

“We know that discrimination and difficult living conditions increase the risk of mental health problems later in life, and we can make those changes and break the intergenerational cycle of violence,” she said.

People on the front lines – therapists, lawyers, teachers and parents – say it’s important to focus efforts on the most vulnerable youth and to break the silence on people with mental health problems.

People used to be locked up in mental asylums where they were hidden and forgotten. Mental illness was considered a shameful personal failure and should not be mentioned.

Peer counseling works

Estephania Plascencia suffered from anxiety and depression for most of her life. After she graduated from college, things really fell apart. She stopped texting her friends and didn’t leave her house for six months.

She got better with medication and therapy. In 2017, she volunteered with the Miami chapter of the National Association of Mental Illness (NAMI). As the host of NAMI’s “Ending the Silence,” Plascencia shared her life story with middle and high school students. In 2019, she became the coordinator of NAMI Miami-Dade’s youth program. She is currently studying for her MPH with a concentration in Biostatistics at Florida International University’s Stamp College of Public Health.

“NAMI has played a really important and fundamental role in my recovery. First of all they helped me to realize that I was not alone. They became part of my support network/family,” she said.

She said NAMI gave her support and validation and allowed her to work with others in similar situations. As she shared her story with med students and high school students, Placencia received many questions. Answering them became the best part of her job. Since the pandemic, she said children are more curious.

Estephania Plascencia joined the National Association of Mental Illness (NAMI) in Miami in 2017 as a volunteer. She became an Ending the Silence host and 2019 NAMI Miami-Dade Youth Program Coordinator.

“A lot of these questions are about, ‘How can I ask for help, especially when my parents don’t believe me?’ Questions about depression and anxiety, questions about how to help friends and what to do when those friends don’t want to get help… Just observing it for myself, I know our youth definitely need help,” Plascencia said .

End of the quiet in Tennessee

Teenage suicides in Tennessee have consistently exceeded the national average since 2012. On a positive note, the Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network reported 1,220 suicide deaths in both 2019 and 2020. As the state’s population increased in 2020, the suicide rate at 17.7 is slightly lower than in 2019 (17.9 per 100,000 people).

“There’s a stigma to saying ‘I have a mental illness,’ and a lot of people don’t want to see anyone or talk about it because they might be embarrassed or people might make fun of them or you should withdraw.” up on your bootstraps and it’s not recognized as a problem,” said Jeff Fladen, NAMI Tennessee Executive Director.

Ending the Silence is a program for middle and high schools or a youth group. It’s about the warning signs of mental illness and what steps to take if you or a loved one are showing symptoms of mental illness. A facilitator like Placencia can come to your school or is available online here: https://ets.nami.org

Besides the stigma, Fladen said the other big issue related to mental illness is health insurance. “If they work for a big employer, there’s a thing called the EAP, Employee Assistance Program, and it’s free. But if you have insurance, it can be difficult to find a provider to treat you,” he said.

Jeff Fladen is NAMI’s General Manager in Tennessee.

Cognitive behavioral therapy and medication are the two most common treatments for mental illness. Studies show that both methods can be effective and some people, like Plascencia, benefit from both. If you have insurance, Fladen said you should call to see what it covers before seeing a counselor or therapist. He found that a family doctor can prescribe antidepressants.

“There are also organizations with tiered fees. Churches, mental hospitals, and various agencies across the state offer tiered counseling, but there isn’t just one number to call. You’ll have to google where you live,” he said.

In Nashville, you can call 211 and the United Way will provide information on resources and local mental health services in the area.

“Even if they don’t have TennCare, there is still a mental health safety net for low-income people that covers certain mental health services,” Fladen said.

“With our Department of Mental Health, we are ahead of many states. Not that everything is perfect, but we have a lot of good things… most schools have what they call a psychiatric department and school social workers. So there’s more counseling in the schools than there used to be in Tennessee, so that’s a good thing.”

The Jason Foundation trains teachers in suicide prevention and has partners in the US and Puerto Rico. Clark Flatt founded the Jason Foundation in 2007 after his son committed suicide.

“One of the things we’re most proud of at the Foundation is that it all started here in the state of Tennessee in 2007,” said Brett Marciel, communications director for the Jason Foundation.

Twenty-one states have passed the Jason Flatt Act, which requires certified teachers to complete two hours of training each year. The foundation raises the money.

“We’re proud to say that we train approximately 60% of the state’s teachers,” said Brett Marciel, communications director for the Jason Foundation.

Brett Marciel is the communications director for the Jason Foundation.

Teachers can supplement their continuing education needs with other programs. You do not have to use the Jason Foundation program or its materials.

“In the last five years, we’ve delivered more than a million suicide prevention and awareness training sessions for educators,” Marciel said.

“Despite all the great strides we’ve made in suicide prevention, post-COVID-19 suicide rates continue to rise, with increased levels of depression and anxiety in young children. I’m worried about where this is going,” he said.

The mental health cooperative has multiple locations in Tennessee. For more than 25 years, it has been helping adults with severe mental illness and children with severe emotional challenges free of charge. More information online here: https://www.mhc-tn.org.

The Department of Mental Health has a fast facts website here: https://www.tn.gov/behavioral-health/research/fast-facts.html

The department also has a “Be the One” suicide prevention campaign available here: https://www.tn.gov/behavioral-health/research/fast-facts.html

The crisis service for children and young people has a nationwide crisis hotline here:https://www.tn.gov/behavioral-health/need-help/children-and-youth.html

The Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network has resources and crisis lines here: https://tspn.org/number-of-suicides-in-tennessee-held-steady-from-2019-to-2020/

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For Mental Health Awareness Mon https://howtousehypnosis.com/for-mental-health-awareness-mon/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 03:38:33 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/for-mental-health-awareness-mon/ RICHMOND, Va., May 19, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — May is Mental Health Awareness Month, a time to increase understanding of the importance of mental health and break the stigma associated with mental illness. Substance Use Disorder (SUD) is a type of mental illness that affects a person’s brain and behavior, causing them to be unable to […]]]>

RICHMOND, Va., May 19, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — May is Mental Health Awareness Month, a time to increase understanding of the importance of mental health and break the stigma associated with mental illness. Substance Use Disorder (SUD) is a type of mental illness that affects a person’s brain and behavior, causing them to be unable to control their use of substances such as legal or illegal drugs, alcohol, or medication.1 In addition, some people with SUD suffer from co-occurring mental illnesses.2 As SUD and overdose deaths across America reach an all-time high, one man’s story offers cause for hope.3

“I tell my story to let other people who suffer from OUD know that there is hope and a way forward.”

The number of people suffering from mental illness has increased in the United States, with nearly one in five adults suffering from a mental illness in 2020, a problem that has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.4.5 According to the 2021 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration report, approximately 5.7 million adults ages 18 and older with serious mental illnesses are affected by substance abuse, and 47.8% of illicit drug users have at least one serious mental illness.6 The need for access to effective treatments for both mental illness and SUD has never been more urgent.

Despite the increasing number of people struggling with SUD and Opioid Use Disorder (OUD), Indivior seeks to instill hope by sharing one man’s personal journey to recovery. Through his story, Kyle of Kansas City wants to inspire others to seek help from family, friends, and healthcare professionals.

“After several years of trying to recover, I was able to find a treatment plan that worked well for me, and I’m proud to say I haven’t touched an illegal drug in over three years,” said Kyle. “I am telling my story to let other people suffering from OUD know that there is hope and a way forward. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. You’ll be amazed at what you can do if you stay on the road to recovery. ”

“Patient stories like Kyle’s fuel our passion and remind us of the importance of the work we do every day. deadline recovery”, said Christian HeidebrederChief Scientific Officer, Individual.

About Opioid Use Disorder (OUD)

Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) is a chronic illness in which people develop a pattern of opioid use that can lead to negative outcomes. OUD can affect the parts of the brain necessary for life-support functions.7

About individual
Indivior is a global pharmaceutical company working to transform the lives of patients by developing medicines to treat substance use disorders (SUD) and serious mental illness. Our vision is that all patients around the world have access to evidence-based treatment for the chronic diseases and comorbidities of SUD. Indivior is dedicated to transforming SUD from a global human crisis into a recognized and treated chronic disease. Building on its global portfolio of OUD treatments, Indivior has a pipeline of product candidates designed to both expand its legacy in this category and potentially address other chronic conditions and co-occurring SUD disorders, including alcohol and cannabis use disorders. Headquartered in the United States in Richmond, VA, Indivior employs more than 900 people worldwide and its product portfolio is available in over 40 countries worldwide. Visitwww.indivior.comto learn more. Connect with Indivior on LinkedIn by visitingwww.linkedin.com/company/individual.

References:

  1. Substance use and co-occurring mental disorders. (nd). National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH). https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/substance-use-and-mental-health#:%7E:text=A%20substance%20use%20disorder%20(SUD,drugs%2C%20alcohol% 2C%20or%20medicines.
  2. The link between substance use disorders and mental illness. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Part 1. Part 1: The link between substance use disorders and mental illness | National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) (nih.gov)
  3. American Medical Association. (2022, 11th January). 2022 is a pivotal year in addressing the deepening drug overdose crisis. https://www.ama-assn.org/about/leadership/2022-critical-year-address-worsening-drug-overdose-crisis
  4. insanity. (2020). National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH). https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/mental-illness
  5. COVID’s mental distress: How scientists are tracking a rise in depression. (2021, 3 February). Nature. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-00175-z?error=cookies_not_supported&code=657755a1-ee16-41be-b635-72d62d3d4931
  6. Administration of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services. (2021). Key indicators of substance use and mental health in The United States: Findings from the 2020 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication #PEP21-07-01-003, NSDUH Series H-56). Rockville, Md: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse Administration and Mental Health Services. Retrieved from https://www.samhsa.gov/data/
  7. US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health. Drugs, Brains, and Behavior: The Science of Addiction. HHS Publication No. (SMA) 18-5063PT5, printed 2018.

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UMass MIND partners with Worcester Theater to support performances dedicated to mental health https://howtousehypnosis.com/umass-mind-partners-with-worcester-theater-to-support-performances-dedicated-to-mental-health/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 13:50:34 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/umass-mind-partners-with-worcester-theater-to-support-performances-dedicated-to-mental-health/ UMass MIND provides resources Game attendees, including scheduled conversations with the cast, crew and mental health professionals after appearances on June 17, 19 and 25. Theatergoers attending Studio Theater Worcester’s rock musical Next to Normal this month will receive accurate, comprehensive information and resources for those whose real lives, like those of the fictional characters […]]]>
UMass MIND provides resources
Game attendees, including scheduled conversations
with the cast, crew and mental health
professionals after appearances
on June 17, 19 and 25.

Theatergoers attending Studio Theater Worcester’s rock musical Next to Normal this month will receive accurate, comprehensive information and resources for those whose real lives, like those of the fictional characters in the play, may be affected by a serious mental illness, thank you to UMass MIN.

UMass MIND, an integrated program from the Department of Psychiatry at UMass Chan Medical School, combines clinical services, community interventions and research focused on individuals with serious mental illness. Next to Normal is a 2008 Tony and Pulitzer Prize-winning musical about a mother struggling with bipolar disorder. The story explores grief, depression, suicide, substance abuse and ethics in modern psychiatry. Six performances of the musical will take place June 16-26 at Salem Covenant Church in Worcester.

“Art and music can be a powerful way for us to connect emotionally with our patients,” said Xiaoduo Fan, MD, professor of psychiatry and director of UMass MIND.

When Studio Theater Worcester founder John Somers approached UMass Chan for help, members of the UMass MIND Community Intervention Program jumped at the opportunity. The program includes a team focused on art and music as a holistic treatment approach for individuals suffering from significant mental health conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder.

“We thought it would be great to get involved in providing mental health resources to the community and facilitating post-show discussions,” said Clara Cabot, a sophomore at TH Chan School of Medicine and director of arts and music education for UMass MIN. “It aligns perfectly with our goals of raising mental health awareness, encouraging community engagement in conversations and reducing the stigma around mental illness.”

Medical students involved in UMass MIND have curated information to add to the Next to Normal playbill program. Also in coordination with UMass MIND, an on-site consultant will be present at the performances to offer viewers support if needed and to facilitate post-show conversations. Scheduled talks with cast, crew and mental health professionals from the Worcester community will take place following performances on June 17, 19 and 25.

“We read the script and songs for terms specific to mental health and compiled them into a vocabulary list. We’ve edited definitions to make them easy for laypeople to understand. We also included quotes from famous people, including entertainment industry celebrities, who have or are dealing with mental illness,” said Danielle Li, a second-year medical student. “We hope that all of this information can encourage audiences to engage further with the play.”

Material is tailored for the Worcester community, specifically with a list of local resources for individuals and families struggling with serious mental illness.

“There’s a lot of interest in mental health in general, but if we address it with an entertainment event, we can make a difference as an organization,” Somers said. “When we came up with the concept of Next to Normal, we wanted to find a way to use theater to address a human need. Partnering with UMass MIND was a natural fit.”

“John’s vision was to use the show as an opportunity to raise public awareness of mental illness and make an impact in the community,” said Dr. Fan. “We’ve been running these types of initiatives for a number of years.”

In addition to UMass MIND, the production is sponsored by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, Worcester Arts Council and the Greater Worcester Community Foundation. Tickets are available on-line and at the door.

Similar stories on UMass Chan News:
UMass MIND was awarded a Drama Therapy Fellowship by the National Endowment of the Arts
UMass MIND hosts Orchestrating Change, music and health documentary and panel discussion
One-act drama Perseverance comes to UMass Medical School on October 19th
Xiaoduo Fan appointed to the PCORI Advisory Committee on Health Care and Disparity Research
WGBH interviews Xiaoduo Fan about racial disparities in mental health care

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Mental health hits home with custom auto business https://howtousehypnosis.com/mental-health-hits-home-with-custom-auto-business/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 13:03:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/mental-health-hits-home-with-custom-auto-business/ APPLETON, Wisconsin – Lisa Iverson recently drove her son Conor Iverson’s red Chevy Silverado to Custom Offsets in Appleton. She may have ridden some of the same roads he ridden three years ago. “I think he was at Custom Offsets for six months. He loved it,” said Lisa Iverson. “It’s almost like he found family […]]]>

APPLETON, Wisconsin – Lisa Iverson recently drove her son Conor Iverson’s red Chevy Silverado to Custom Offsets in Appleton.

She may have ridden some of the same roads he ridden three years ago.

“I think he was at Custom Offsets for six months. He loved it,” said Lisa Iverson. “It’s almost like he found family there.”

He also loved his truck and even created an Instagram page Therefore. He shared his passion for modified vehicles with his colleagues.

While it seemed like Conor Iverson had found his calling, he also dealt with anxiety and depression. He took his own life, which affected everyone around him.

(Lisa Iverson)

“October will be three years before he’s gone, which is incredible because every day is like this day,” said Lisa Iverson.

Family and friends were devastated. It also impacted his peers, who began raising funds for the nonprofit Preventing Suicide: Fox Cities.

(Jon Fuller/Spectrum News)

“It’s affecting us deeply as a company as a colleague has been impacted, but also us personally,” said Sam Lowe, director of marketing for Fitment Industries. “Mental health awareness is a big thing and we’re going to work with them on that and promote it in the community as well.”

The group plans a modified car and truck show in the Resch center on 25.6.

“Everyone who registers for the event, a portion of the registration goes to the charity, along with the attendees,” Lowe said.

(Jon Fuller/Spectrum News)

The dealers also donated raffle items. Money from raffle ticket sales also goes to Prevent Suicide: Fox Cities.

While the Midwest is a hotbed for classic car shows, organizers hope to attract a new generation interested in modern cars.

“When I was a kid, I was inspired by ‘Fast & Furious’ and all that stuff,” Lowe said. “That’s exactly what we want to do, to inspire the next generation of car enthusiasts.”

(Jon Fuller/Spectrum News)

Lisa Iverson will be present at the event. She created a journal and condolence cards for others who lost loved ones.

“If you’re going through this, you’re not alone,” she said. “Find your people. You have to find your people or I don’t think you can make it through this grief.”

Conor Iverson’s favorite truck will also be there. Before he died he had a wish list of mods for it. The family was surprised when Custom Offset’s founder made sure construction was complete.

“It was something we couldn’t even imagine. Who does that? Who is spending all that money? It was so phenomenal,” his mother said.

The truck will eventually go to Conor Iverson’s two sons, who will also be cared for in other ways. The company set up trusts for the boys.

“[Founder Shawn Chartier] was adamant. They will have their own house when they are 18. Go to college and get paid for it,” Lisa Iverson said. “Who’s doing this? Really? Who’s doing this? We’re just so honored to have them in our lives. It’s just amazing and we didn’t expect anything from it.”

(Jon Fuller/Spectrum News)

Custom Offsets has a plaque in the break room. It reads: You are not alone.

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West Kelowna resident biking across BC to raise mental health awareness – Saanich News https://howtousehypnosis.com/west-kelowna-resident-biking-across-bc-to-raise-mental-health-awareness-saanich-news/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/west-kelowna-resident-biking-across-bc-to-raise-mental-health-awareness-saanich-news/ About a year ago, Sam Biffart got a new gravel bike and that’s how it all started. Now a year has passed and the West Kelowna resident is horseback riding across the province to raise money for mental health. When he first got the bike, he took it on a journey, stopping at various hotels […]]]>

About a year ago, Sam Biffart got a new gravel bike and that’s how it all started.

Now a year has passed and the West Kelowna resident is horseback riding across the province to raise money for mental health.

When he first got the bike, he took it on a journey, stopping at various hotels along the way and beginning to like the feeling of cycling from place to place.

“I just fell in love with the whole idea and set my mind and body up for the challenges,” Biffart said.

After the trip, the 22-year-old wondered how he could grow with the next challenge, and that’s when the idea of ​​driving across BC came to him

“For me, the only thing I’ve really considered doing for a fundraiser is something that affects me personally, and that would be mental health,” Biffart said. “I’ve always struggled with social anxiety and I thought this would be a great way to raise awareness about something that affects me personally. I think mental health is extremely relevant right now, with COVID and all.”

Biffart looked for charities and organizations to work with and when he came across Third Space Charity he knew immediately it would be a great fit as they reach out to people aged 18-30 to help with their mental health help.

Third Space was immediately enthusiastic about the idea, started the plans and set up a fundraising page.

After months of setting up the ride and route, Biffart launched Sunday 5 June from Victoria. Just a week into the trip, Biffart is averaging about 100 kilometers a day but has also faced many challenges, from washed out trails to missing bridges. In the first week, more than 100 kilometers were added because you had to turn around and take a different route.

He tries to walk the Trans-Canada Trail as much as possible.

“It’s definitely been a pretty wild adventure so far,” Biffart said. “Every day had its complications, but every day was also a success.”

Biffart also says he hopes to finish on June 20 or 21 in Kananaskis, Alta. He also wants to thank all of his sponsors for supporting him throughout the adventure.

Click here to donate to Biffart’s tour of the provinces here and to follow him for the ride, follow him here.


@cunninghamjordy
jordy.cunningham@kelowacapnews.com
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The Bayonne Interfaith Clergy Association will once again host mental health events https://howtousehypnosis.com/the-bayonne-interfaith-clergy-association-will-once-again-host-mental-health-events/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 16:49:47 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/the-bayonne-interfaith-clergy-association-will-once-again-host-mental-health-events/ The Bayonne Interfaith Clergy Association is partnering with the City of Bayonne to host a series of mental health awareness events at 16th Street Park. The inaugural streak began last summer as residents looked for some normality amid the easing of COVID-19 restrictions. In conversation with the News from the Bayonne communityRev. Dorothy Patterson of […]]]>

The Bayonne Interfaith Clergy Association is partnering with the City of Bayonne to host a series of mental health awareness events at 16th Street Park. The inaugural streak began last summer as residents looked for some normality amid the easing of COVID-19 restrictions.

In conversation with the News from the Bayonne communityRev. Dorothy Patterson of the Wallace Temple AME Zion Church described how important these types of events are now more than ever.

Promoting mental health awareness

“We still hold onto the underlying theme of mental health awareness,” Patterson said. “This piece is important. You can’t let that go. It’s just too big. We see it every day.”

Patterson saw the need for more mental health awareness and said the Bayonne Interfaith Clergy Association had decided to hold the series of events again. The first event will focus on knowledge sharing and awareness raising.

“So we’re providing resources that are focused on mental health awareness,” she said.

This event will provide residents with mental health resources and information along with some free sweet treats on June 30 at 6:30 p.m. at 16th Street Park. Patterson said there are a number of organizations in Bayonne and some that operate nationwide and will be present.

“We’re going to have at least 20 different organizations there just for people to come out and get free information,” she said. “We’ll probably also have free ice cream that we’ll give out because it’s probably going to be a hot day in June.”

Film screening in July

Following a format similar to last year, Patterson said the second event will be a film showing at the park next month. Local residents can gather to watch”Encanto” at approximately 7:30 p.m. July 28 at 16th Street Park or after the sun has set to see the film outside.

“Then we’ll come back in July and do a movie,” Patterson said. “The underlying theme is still [mental health awareness].”

Patterson added that there will be a presentation before the film starts, possibly something related to school safety. In the course of the killing spree in Uvalde, among other problems in schools, the topic is highly topical.

“Based on everything that’s going on, we can do something about it, maybe a 30-minute segment, and then we go into the movie,” she said.

Similar mental health resources will also be available at the second event. According to Patterson, the goal of the screening is also to promote mental health awareness.

“I can’t stress enough how important it is to be aware of what’s going on in terms of your own personal mental health,” she said.

Part of being aware is engaging with it Self-care, striving to be mentally healthier, and breaking the stigma of mental health and seeking treatment, Patterson said.

Break the stigma

Sometimes the stigma around mental illness and getting help is enough to prevent people from seeking treatment. Patterson wants to address that, too.

“Those stigmas become a barrier and walls that are put up don’t allow us to be the healthier person we can be,” she said. “They are a hindrance to seek advice.”

According to Patterson, she and many of her peers have a counselor, which is an important part of maintaining good mental health.

“Something we really want to emphasize is having a counselor, someone you can come with and talk to about any situation or challenge that may come up in your life,” she said. “Over the last two years it’s definitely made the situation worse because you’re grieving after grief after grief… I don’t have all the answers, but I tell people all the time that they are looking for help. There are agencies, there are advice centers, there are people in this city who can help. Sometimes people just need someone to listen to them. That’s what consultants do.”

Patterson reiterated that there has never been a more important time for mental health awareness, which is why the series of events continued this year. And more events are likely to be announced for the coming months.

For updates on this and other stories, visit www.hudsonreporter.com and follow us on Twitter @hudson_reporter. Daniel Israel can be reached at disrael@hudsonreporter.com.

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