Mental Health Awareness – How To Use Hypnosis http://howtousehypnosis.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 15:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://howtousehypnosis.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Mental Health Awareness – How To Use Hypnosis http://howtousehypnosis.com/ 32 32 Seniors’ Without Walls celebrates men’s health awareness through an interactive, sports-based reminder program https://howtousehypnosis.com/seniors-without-walls-celebrates-mens-health-awareness-through-an-interactive-sports-based-reminder-program/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/seniors-without-walls-celebrates-mens-health-awareness-through-an-interactive-sports-based-reminder-program/ Sessions will take place from Wed. January 4 to Wed. February 22, 2023, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. Registration deadline is November 30. Senior Center Without Walls (SCWW) is preparing for the celebration by unveiling its sports-based remembrance program. Sessions will take place from Wed. January 4 to Wed. February 22, 2023, 10 a.m. to […]]]>

Sessions will take place from Wed. January 4 to Wed. February 22, 2023, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. Registration deadline is November 30.

Senior Center Without Walls (SCWW) is preparing for the celebration by unveiling its sports-based remembrance program. Sessions will take place from Wed. January 4 to Wed. February 22, 2023, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m

Program Coordinator for SCWW Ronda Wedhorn believes in “Empowering Seniors to Live Dignified Life.” She invites all seniors to join the friendly and welcoming group of Saskatchewan sports fans to remember all the sports they love.

Sport activities can stimulate conversations, bring people together and form diverse communities. Generations of people have always been connected to sport, from breakfast in the morning to coffee breaks in the evening. One of the easiest ways to communicate with different people can be through sports.

SCWW has always been supportive of the community and elderly residents of Moose Jaw. Over the years, SCWW has organized many different programs for the improvement and mental health care of the elderly. Seniors are very sensitive and an important part of our community and require careful and constant care. By the age of 50 or 60, many seniors lose their communicative sensibilities after some have retired or become less active. SCWW is a wonderful organization that brings seniors together with simple interactive activities that can have a huge impact on their daily lives.

Sports-based remembrance is a great way to break out of the isolation faced by many seniors in nursing homes and those who no longer have as much social interaction. This interaction is an essential necessity in the elderly. A hot cup of coffee or warm melted chocolate and socializing with sports geeks on the phone is a fun way to start a chilly morning.

Participation in all SCWW programs is simple and easy. Signing up for SCWW programs and attending these sessions is just a simple phone call away. All programs are designed in conference form so that many participants interact together.

No computers, the internet or exceptional technological skills are required to participate. All you need is just a phone and the ability to dial into the SCWW contact number to join the conversation.

All materials required to participate in some of the SCWW activities will be shipped via Canada Post. The best thing about SCWW is that all of their services are free and just a phone call away. Any Saskatchewan resident who is 60 years of age or older may join. Places are limited, please register early. The courses for the sports memory program will take place from January 4 to February 22, 2023 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Registration closes on November 30th. To register for the program, SCWW requires your name and phone number by calling 306-631-4357 (no SMS). You can also email them to swwsask@gmail.com.

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Laker Student Media releases a scoop about the new episode – The Merciad https://howtousehypnosis.com/laker-student-media-releases-a-scoop-about-the-new-episode-the-merciad/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 19:10:56 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/laker-student-media-releases-a-scoop-about-the-new-episode-the-merciad/ The latest episode of Lak-er Student Media’s “What’s the Scoop?” podcast covered an important topic: mental health awareness for student athletes. With 770 student-athletes on the Mercyhurst campus, this is clearly a big reason. Physical education students face more pressure than non-athletes due to the combined responsibilities of team commitments and academics. Mercyhurst celebrated Mental […]]]>

The latest episode of Lak-er Student Media’s “What’s the Scoop?” podcast covered an important topic: mental health awareness for student athletes. With 770 student-athletes on the Mercyhurst campus, this is clearly a big reason. Physical education students face more pressure than non-athletes due to the combined responsibilities of team commitments and academics. Mercyhurst celebrated Mental Health Week October 1-8 with numerous activities and events on campus. Joining hosts Lauren Roberts and Kate Hennessy on the new episode of “What’s the Scoop?” were student-athlete Rachel Plumley and Assistant Athletic Director of Health and Wellness Sue Swee-ney. Rachel Plumley is a junior on the Mercyhurst Women’s Lacrosse Team. She is one of the Mercy Hurst Ambassadors for Morgan’s Message, an organization dedicated to raising mental health awareness among student athletes. Morgan’s Message was founded in memory of Morgan Rogers, a collegiate lacrosse player who struggled with mental health issues after suffering an injury during her collegiate career and committed suicide. Mercyhurst has partnered with Morgan’s Message and another organization, Hilinski’s Hope, for Mental Health Awareness Week. Hilinski’s Hope was founded in memory of Tyler Hilinski, a college football player who committed suicide in 2018 at the age of 21. Mercyhurst was one of more than 100 colleges partnering with Hilinski’s Hope for College Football Mental Health Awareness Week. On the What’s the Scoop? Podcast page, Roberts and Sweeney discussed the campus events taking place in conjunction with Mental Health Awareness Week. From October 1-8, college sporting events — including the October 1 soccer game against Edinboro University — included speeches honoring Tyler Hilinski and other student and athlete suicide victims. At the football game and other sporting events, the third quarter or portion of the event included a moment of silence during which the crowd was asked to hold up three fingers to pay tribute to Hilinski, wearing jersey number 3. Athletes wore ribbons and pins to signal their support for mental health awareness. Another on-campus event to promote mental health awareness was a screening of You Don’t Have to Do It Alone in the fraternity’s Great Room. After the film, licensed counselor Linda Graves moderated a discussion on mental health issues. To create a warm, welcoming environment, Swee-ney, Graves and the other planners provided stickers and coloring books. The event was a clear success, attracting a large turnout and many representatives from various sports teams and clubs. The discussion was the highlight of the evening. “A lot of people talked, and they were very well spoken,” Plumley said. “It was honestly such a good discussion that people felt more comfortable talking about what they were going through.” According to Plumley and Sweeney’s conversation, the mental health awareness program had multiple purposes. First, it established representation at every sporting event, furthering the cause of mental health awareness. In addition, it should increase student participation and show students and physical education students in particular that coaches and the athletics department care about them. Finally, the program sought to end the stigma surrounding mental health so that discussion of mental health could become commonplace and welcome. Looking ahead, Plumley anticipates additional Morgan’s Message-related events on campus, including another video screening and a night of relaxation. “One of our goals for spring is to do more Morgan’s Message dedication games,” she said. “These games typically raise funds and the money goes back to Morgan’s Message.” In her role as Assistant AD for Health and Wellness, Sweeney plans programs on health-related issues such as nutrition, mental health and substance abuse for student athletes. While she sometimes enlists speakers to deliver these presentations, she often takes the lead herself, which can be very rewarding. “I want the students to know, besides their team, that there are people in administration who are there to support them,” she said. “Getting the students to talk and being comfortable talking is one of the coolest things to see.” Sweeney also coordinates the coaches of Mercyhurst’s sports teams and leads initiatives such as first aid training for mental health coaches Health. Thanks to the efforts of administration, coaches and student athletes, Mercyhurst has made great strides in raising awareness of student athlete mental health. But there is always room for growth. “We have to figure out how to centralize the information so people don’t miss anything,” Sweeney said. Additionally, COVID disrupted normal campus activity for two years, so organizations like the athletics department are still working to overcome this hurdle. For anyone hoping to increase their understanding of mental health, they agreed that mindfulness is an important step. “It’s almost like lifting weights,” Sweeney said of practicing mindfulness. “It’s what works for you because everyone’s mental health is different,” Plumley said. “At the end of the day, it’s all about you.” Sweeney agreed, saying, “Find the things that make you feel disconnected from normal life.” Sweeney also recommends increased connection with friends and classmates. “Students working with faculty and staff on initiatives — that’s this engaged community,” Sweeney concluded, which should be a goal of everyone at Mercyhurst. Mental Health Awareness Week activities were an example of this commitment and the positive impact it is having on the entire Laker community.

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FCJ students promote mental health support through pop-up tent initiative https://howtousehypnosis.com/fcj-students-promote-mental-health-support-through-pop-up-tent-initiative/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/fcj-students-promote-mental-health-support-through-pop-up-tent-initiative/ THE TY students at FCJ Bunclody recently took part in a very successful mental health initiative raising awareness of bystander support services around the city. Working with Wexford Mental Health, the students set up a mental health pop-up tent on the Mall in the city center and distributed awareness leaflets from there. The students are […]]]>

THE TY students at FCJ Bunclody recently took part in a very successful mental health initiative raising awareness of bystander support services around the city.

Working with Wexford Mental Health, the students set up a mental health pop-up tent on the Mall in the city center and distributed awareness leaflets from there.

The students are participating in this year’s Gaisce Awards initiative and as part of it they had to do community work and a decision was made to promote mental health awareness.

About the initiative, Wexford Mental Health’s Niall O Muiri said it had been a great success and had given students the opportunity to learn about mental health support themselves while promoting it among members of the wider community.

Niall teaches mental health and wellbeing in schools and has been involved with the FCJ students through a six week program.

“People often put fliers in public places and in schools, but people often don’t read them as much as they should,” Niall said.

“But the main goal with this was to have the students distribute the Big 8 pamphlet and a pamphlet on stress and anxiety management,” he added.

Another aspect of the initiative was to encourage men to be aware of the importance of opening up about their mental health and of the different types of support available.

“The students really enjoyed it and that was very important and they got information from it as well,” Niall said.

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Annual Veteran Suicide Awareness March spotlights veterans’ mental health | WFRV Local 5 https://howtousehypnosis.com/annual-veteran-suicide-awareness-march-spotlights-veterans-mental-health-wfrv-local-5/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 05:13:47 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/annual-veteran-suicide-awareness-march-spotlights-veterans-mental-health-wfrv-local-5/ GREEN BAY, Wisconsin (WFRV) – More than a thousand people gathered for the tenth annual Veteran Suicide Awareness March. Veterans marching say the event is the perfect opportunity to honor those who lost their lives. Veterans who support the march say they hope to empower those who may be struggling mentally. “They are loved, they […]]]>

GREEN BAY, Wisconsin (WFRV) – More than a thousand people gathered for the tenth annual Veteran Suicide Awareness March. Veterans marching say the event is the perfect opportunity to honor those who lost their lives.

Veterans who support the march say they hope to empower those who may be struggling mentally.

“They are loved, they have support, they are not alone. There are people who go through that every day and I wish they would see that,” said veteran Tate Shafer.

The march sheds light on the mental health of those who serve. Shafer says he’s lost several friends to suicide and he’s marching to honor them.

“Due to my mental health, I lost two friends in 2018 to honor their memory and show support for other soldiers who may be going through this mental trauma, to show they are not alone and to speak up,” Shafer explained.

Research shows that 17.6 veterans die by suicide every day, Chelsea Kocken, board member of Helping Out Our American Heroes, says the community is doing everything it can to reduce that number.

Today provides that sense of community and resources to focus on mental health. You know this is something that’s so often overlooked and taken for granted that you know simple things can really improve your overall mental health,” Kocken said.

Kocken says paying attention to veterans is the easiest way to make a difference.

“This isn’t that big a deal, we need to have a strategic plan, that’s just hey, be aware of the issue that exists in our community, pay attention to the people around you and remember how simple it is Just to make that small impact and it could really make a difference,” Kocken said.

The event is scheduled to take place again next year. Organizers say they expect to raise more than $100,000 for veteran services.

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Jewel explains where her positivity comes from https://howtousehypnosis.com/jewel-explains-where-her-positivity-comes-from/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 16:52:30 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/jewel-explains-where-her-positivity-comes-from/ TALENTRECAP.COM talent American song contest Andrew Portugal November 9, 2022 Photo by Trae Patton/NBC Four-time Grammy nominee Jewel recently opened up about her background and life story on Sherri Shepherd’s talk show. The singer is a strong advocate for mental health and is raising awareness by not being alone in the challenge. Jewel was homeless […]]]>


Jewel on the red carpet of the American Song Contest.Photo by Trae Patton/NBC

Four-time Grammy nominee Jewel recently opened up about her background and life story on Sherri Shepherd’s talk show. The singer is a strong advocate for mental health and is raising awareness by not being alone in the challenge.

Jewel was homeless when she got her first record deal

Having humble beginnings is a common beginning for most high-profile celebrities and artists today, and Jewel is no different. Since then, the folk music icon has graced the world with over three decades of unforgettable and comforting songs.

During her guest appearance on Sherri, The talk show host began by highlighting Jewel’s great sense of humor. Jewel explained that people who have gone through the toughest times use humor to help them cope with their experiences.

After that, Jewel began sharing details about her life growing up in Homer, Alaska and leaving home when she was just 15. She ended up homeless one day after disagreeing with granting sexual favors to a former boss. She was left to sleep in her car, which unfortunately was stolen from her, and forced to sleep on the street.

During this time, she was spotted performing on the same streets and making ends meet. The pair went on to talk about the singer’s then-newfound fame and how she didn’t know how to properly handle it. After that, Shepherd brought it up The singer‘s latest album, freewheeling woman, which came after a seven-year hiatus. The long break was taken to allow Jewel to focus on her family, which she prioritizes over her work.

She has her own mental health awareness campaign

To continue the mental health theme, Jewel announced #NotAloneChallenge in partnership with iHeartRadio. Jewel is a strong advocate for raising awareness and is committed to providing effective mental health solutions.

The campaign’s mission is to raise funds to provide free mental health resources to those in need. Studies show that nearly 50% of Americans do not have access to mental health resources and tools. Jewel plans to fix this by allowing fans to offer “heroic” auction items, from handcrafted art to actual donations, which will be accepted with full appreciation.

At the same time, part of the proceeds will be donated to other foundations that aim to help at-risk youth. Jewel will do her part to solve problems that can affect anyone in the world today. This admirable part of herself gives her the charisma she has retained over the years.

Let us know what you think about this article



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Can Solitaire Games Improve Your Sanity? https://howtousehypnosis.com/can-solitaire-games-improve-your-sanity/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 09:18:09 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/can-solitaire-games-improve-your-sanity/ Also known as Patience, Cabal and Klondike Solitaire This single-player card game first appeared in Europe in the early 18th century. The oldest known collection of puzzles was published in Russia in 1826. Similar games soon appeared in Germany, France and Scandinavia. The Scandinavian version is called Cabale, and Cabale means secret knowledge in French. […]]]>

Also known as Patience, Cabal and Klondike Solitaire This single-player card game first appeared in Europe in the early 18th century. The oldest known collection of puzzles was published in Russia in 1826. Similar games soon appeared in Germany, France and Scandinavia.

The Scandinavian version is called Cabale, and Cabale means secret knowledge in French. The secret knowledge revealed through the cards was used by ancient seers in divination to answer important questions and provide basic guidance.

When Windows 3.0 was released in 1990, a free version of Solitaire was installed in its operating system to make it easier for users to navigate with the mouse. Since then, Solitaire has been an online hit. It was recently inducted into the World Video Game Hall of Fame.

Solitaire: Because it’s good for you

Games like Klondike Solitaire can improve your mental health by helping you relax and unwind. There are also other advantages:

Relieves Anxiety

Many mental disorders are triggered by extreme stress and anxiety. If you focus on it, you will feel overwhelmed, helpless, angry, powerless, and bullied.

When you’re focused on solving a solitaire deck, you’re taking actionable steps to achieve a given goal. It makes you feel empowered, and the stronger you feel, the less likely you are to have a panic attack.

Sharpens knowledge

Getting through a day of heavy brain fog can be a frustrating experience. Clear thinking is essential for making informed decisions. Fuzzy thinking can distort your perception and cause you to make poor judgments. A solitaire session can help clear the cobwebs.

Improves organizational skills

Solitaire challenges you to bring order to chaos by moving a random distribution of cards into four ordered decks. Since every game is different, you will be constantly challenged to implement new strategies.

Winning this game can be very comforting when you’re feeling off balance, incompetent, or brain dead.

Teaches Patience

Klondike Solitaire, also known as Patience, is not an easy game to win. You can play game after game and lose every time. In this situation, you must be patient and take advantage of every opportunity the cards offer you.

To improve your solitaire experience, you can use the undo button to find out which moves would work best in the current tableau. However, there is no way of knowing if these plays will be beneficial later in the game.

The saving grace is that when you win, you win more than enough to make up for all the games you lost.

Lift the mood

Short sessions of solitaire can clear your mind, calm your mind and improve your mood. Playing the game reduces anxiety and helps you feel calm and focused. When anxiety and stress are reduced, you can’t help but feel better.

According to Psychology Today, solitaire helps players get into a state of flow. “Flow is a cognitive state in which one is completely absorbed in an activity—from painting and writing to prayer and surfing. It involves intense focus, creative engagement, and a loss of time and self-awareness.”

Increases memory

Solitaire helps players develop short-term memory. Researchers tell us that people who play games can learn, iterate, store, and review data faster than those who don’t.

Expands observation skills

Missing a move in Solitaire because you can’t see it is more common than you think. It’s entirely possible to miss moves that are literally staring you in the face.

Not making a crucial move because you can’t see it can keep you from winning the game. It all depends on how the missed games affect the current layout of the cards.

To be an effective solitaire player, you need well-developed observation skills. You must be aware of all possible moves at all times.

Promotes mindfulness

Researchers have found that solitaire can improve mindfulness by putting you in a meditative state. Mindfulness means being fully present in the now moment and aware of your actions and your surroundings.

Mindfulness can reduce work-related burnout, improve overall mental health, and help you make more informed decisions. These results have been well documented by researchers.

Encourages creativity

In a study at the University of Amsterdam, researchers compared mindfulness qualities such as observation, awareness, and descriptiveness to creative qualities such as inventiveness, flexible thinking, and innovation.

In the first study, students with high attention levels had fewer new ideas on awareness and lower scores on originality.

In a second study, the team examined how observation skills, descriptive power, and nonjudgmental acceptance interact with creativity.

They found that strong observational skills were associated with creativity, originality, and flexible thinking. Descriptive skills and nonjudgmental acceptance did not impact creativity or originality.

Two additional studies published in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin showed that individuals with strong observational skills had higher levels of creativity.

The researchers emphasized that only certain characteristics of mindfulness are said to increase creativity. If you want to be more creative, focus on sharpening your observational skills. Avoid practicing full awareness. It can exhaust your creativity instead of expanding it.

Regularly engaging in mindful activities like solitaire can reduce anxiety, relieve depression, and alleviate stress. Creative pursuits that encourage mindfulness can even help you safely process trauma. A game of solitaire takes us away from the world for a while and it makes us feel better. The better we feel, the healthier we become.

Can I get addicted to Solitaire?

An addiction is behavior that persists even though it has serious consequences for you and your loved ones. You want to stop but you can’t. Real addiction controls your life. It drives you and you can’t do anything about it.

Christopher Ferguson, a clinical psychologist at Stetson University, reminds us that although it’s easy to confuse the two, there’s a big difference between passion and addiction.

Before you decide to give up solitaire because you might become addicted, remember that this game offers advantages that you won’t have from watching TV.

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New Nonprofit NRVE in Dallas to Launch with Focus on Mental Health » Dallas Innovates https://howtousehypnosis.com/new-nonprofit-nrve-in-dallas-to-launch-with-focus-on-mental-health-dallas-innovates/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 22:40:44 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/new-nonprofit-nrve-in-dallas-to-launch-with-focus-on-mental-health-dallas-innovates/ Dennu Devulapally [Photo: NRVE] Throughout his life, Dunnu Devulapally has witnessed firsthand the struggles that mental health issues can cause. It’s something he’s grappled with personally, having had an early identity crisis stemming from being a first-generation American and later struggling with substance abuse as a high school student. It’s also something that has caused […]]]>

Throughout his life, Dunnu Devulapally has witnessed firsthand the struggles that mental health issues can cause. It’s something he’s grappled with personally, having had an early identity crisis stemming from being a first-generation American and later struggling with substance abuse as a high school student. It’s also something that has caused him to lose numerous friends later in his life.

“I’ve lost a lot of friends to various mental health issues,” Devulapally told Dallas Innovates. “It was something that rocked my life.”

But instead of being consumed by grief, Devulapally tries to use his experience to help others dealing with mental health issues. After forming in May, Devulapally is launching a new Dallas-based non-profit research organization NRVE this weekend. He hopes it will become a focal point to accelerate other mental health initiatives.

“What’s really missing is that a lot of people go into an industry believing that they are the solution or that they already know the solution instead of saying, ‘Let’s gather a lot of information about the industry as a whole,'” Devulapally said Then use that data to “really target specific facets that could yield results faster.”

NRVE focuses on six key areas

Originally geared to focus on something that affected him personally — addressing the rise in opioid use — Devulapally began meeting with mentors, friends who would later join, and community members, and decided to expand his efforts. The nonprofit, aimed at younger generations, now has six areas it is delving into: youth awareness, support for veterans, support for the homeless, and research into substance abuse, domestic violence, and suicide prevention.

“These are issues that are very important to all of us personally,” Devulapally said. “We want to use this first year as a kind of opportunity to really understand ourselves.”

Devulapally said NRVE will first dive into these six areas, see what mental health needs are needed in different regions across the country, and use the information gathered to inform future efforts. Ultimately, he hopes to create a brand and community around the nonprofit to raise awareness of the issues it aims to address.

Altered moods as well as the ecosystem as a whole

“In the not-for-profit world, you don’t have these recognizable names like we have in the for-profit world, where you have Apple, Facebook and Amazon,” Devulapally said. “We truly believe that restructuring the way organizations position themselves towards society will change the way people think about nonprofit organizations. And that will change a lot in the ecosystem as a whole.”

With the information gathered, NRVE plans to become the “Google” for the mental health field, collecting and disseminating insights to help other groups and nonprofits better focus and accelerate their own initiatives.

“If we can really interface and slowly build up a long game, sort of like an oracle if you will, so that the industry with these big packets of data understands what the problems are overall,” Devulapally said. “And then you can literally connect with the industry as a whole to get them to solve problems better together.”

NRVE starts this Saturday

NRVE is scheduled to officially start on Saturday. It begins with an awareness-raising 40-mile bike ride between downtown Dallas and downtown Fort Worth. The ride was organized by both NRVE and Holistic Health, an e-commerce brand led by Devulapally, which will help raise money for NRVE. The day will culminate in one Black Tie Gala Saturday night featuring a silent auction and live performances by local artists, along with wine and appetizers ‘from around the world’.

Devulapally said the goal of the event is to raise $10,000 to support NRVE’s efforts. With this funding, the non-profit organization intends to launch its first two initiatives in the coming year. Returning to the initial focus Devulapally had in founding NRVE, one of the initiatives will be working to provide the Fort Worth Police Department with Narcan – an opioid overdose reversal drug – to use in their squad cars and at can carry themselves. The other will focus on providing socks to homeless people in south Dallas, something that Devulapally says is a much-needed piece of clothing for that population. In addition, the organization plans to launch Rocky—a dog mascot for NRVE that the nonprofit plans to create content and programs around—to raise awareness of mental health issues.

“I would like to see NRVE eventually evolve into a repository, a database of nature-based information that many organizations could interface with. My goal going forward is to be the entity that can speed up the process so we can resolve issues faster,” said Devulapally. “I want us to really pretend that if anyone has something they want to solve, they could theoretically come up with a simple way and provide an answer based on the data available.”

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Mental health awareness campaign heads to Rio Claro https://howtousehypnosis.com/mental-health-awareness-campaign-heads-to-rio-claro/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 21:16:09 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/mental-health-awareness-campaign-heads-to-rio-claro/ news Laurel V Williams 3 hrs ago Mental Health at the Ministry of Health, Dr. Hazel Othello, speaking at the Department’s Paint De Town Green event to be held Wednesday at the Mayaro/Rio Claro Regional Corporation parking lot. The initiative aims to raise awareness of mental health. Photo by Lincoln Holder”/>The Director of the Department […]]]>




Mental Health at the Ministry of Health, Dr. Hazel Othello, speaking at the Department’s Paint De Town Green event to be held Wednesday at the Mayaro/Rio Claro Regional Corporation parking lot. The initiative aims to raise awareness of mental health. Photo by Lincoln Holder”/>
The Director of the Department of Mental Health at the Ministry of Health, Dr. Hazel Othello, speaking at the Department’s Paint De Town Green event to be held Wednesday at the Mayaro/Rio Claro Regional Corporation parking lot. The initiative aims to raise awareness of mental health. Photo by Lincoln Holder

After a two-year hiatus caused by the Covid19 pandemic, the Paint De Town Green forum resumed in Rio Claro on Wednesday.

The day-long event took place in the Mayaro/Rio Claro Regional Corporation parking lot.

It commemorates World Mental Health Day, which is observed on October 10th.

The Director of the Department of Mental Health at the Ministry of Health, Dr. Hazel Othello, gave the keynote address. She told the gathering the green river is the international symbol of mental health awareness.

The Paint De Town Green Forum was the brainchild of Caroline Ravello, founder of the NGO Create Better Minds.

“It’s an annual forum for growing public awareness of mental health, as well as addressing the stigma and discrimination that so often surrounds everything related to mental health,” Othello said.

Mental health professionals speak to a member of the public at a Paint De Town Green event hosted by the Department of Health’s Mental Health Division in the Mayaro/Rio Claro Regional Corporation parking lot on Wednesday. The event was held to raise awareness of mental health. Photo by Lincoln Holder

The event was hosted by the Ministry of Health in collaboration with several organizations such as the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization.

Othello recalled that the 2018 Forum began at Brian Lara Promenade in Port of Spain and continued over the next year at Gulf City Mall in La Romaine. The pandemic prevented it in 2020 and 2021.

She expressed her delight at “painting the city of Rio Claro green today.”

Company chairman Raymond Cozier said that in addition to focusing on mental health, people should also pay attention to their mental, social and physical health.

He urged people to speak up about mental health issues, saying they are nothing to be ashamed of.

“Get in the habit of asking for help. we need each other Don’t be afraid or ashamed. Talk to a friend, family or professional about how you’re feeling,” he said.

Eastern Regional Health Authority CEO Ronald Tsoi-a-Fatt said he is pleased that many organizations are joining the authority for the Paint de Town Green Forum. He said green represents fertility and good health.

Tsoi-a-Fatt said: “The campaign aims to tackle the stigma associated with mental health and well-being and to promote access to and support services in communities to encourage healthy behaviors.”

PAHO representative Dr. Erica Wheeler said the stigma associated with mental disorders sometimes gets in the way, preventing people from seeking and receiving treatment.

She added that stigma can occur with friends and family, at home, at school, in the workplace, or even in healthcare facilities.

Representatives offered free services such as blood glucose testing and on-site counseling. They also distributed pamphlets and flyers about mental health.

A flyer listed “Ten Steps to Mental Health” and urged people to get involved, stay active, relax, ask for help, survive and thrive, keep in touch with friends, do something creative do, talk about it, enjoy what they do and accept who they are.

For more information, contact the Department of Health at 285-9126 ext. 2577, 2571, 2573.

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COLUMN: Now is the time to improve behavioral healthcare | opinion https://howtousehypnosis.com/column-now-is-the-time-to-improve-behavioral-healthcare-opinion/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/column-now-is-the-time-to-improve-behavioral-healthcare-opinion/ The first week of October was Mental Health Awareness Week and for a few days we observed together the crisis exposed by the ongoing fallout from COVID-19: access to mental health care is challenging at best; For marginalized and underserved communities, this can be nearly impossible. dr Jeffrey Geller, co-chair of the nonprofit Integrated Center […]]]>

The first week of October was Mental Health Awareness Week and for a few days we observed together the crisis exposed by the ongoing fallout from COVID-19: access to mental health care is challenging at best; For marginalized and underserved communities, this can be nearly impossible.

dr Jeffrey Geller, co-chair of the nonprofit Integrated Center for Group Medical Visits (ICGMV), a national leader in the group medical care model with strong roots in Lawrence, said he and his staff frequently see large numbers of patients in need of psychiatric care but just can’t find it.

“Our group members come to our clinic and cannot sleep at night for fear of disaster. They talk about sleeping on friends’ couches, giving up dreams to graduate school, losing everything and losing loved ones,” he said.

Better access to mental health and behavioral health care has always been crucial. But key public discussions that have recently begun to weaken the stigma surrounding mental illness combined with a post-COVID surge in care demand have created a new environment for reflection and reform.

We have been heartened in recent weeks by increased calls for behavioral health funding and investment in local care systems, by pressure from government regulators on health plans to cover more mental health services, and talks aimed at improving measures to strengthen the sector’s workforce pipeline , which is facing burnout and attrition in the wake of the pandemic. (According to an Oct. 11 report by the Massachusetts Health and Hospital Association, hospitals north of Boston reported the second-highest number of patients in the state “boarding” emergency rooms (116) while awaiting psychiatric admissions. And that’s largely the case due to staff shortages.)

And while raising awareness of this simmering crisis was indeed an important first step to turning it around, we must now look at ways we can collectively take action to ensure that access to mental health care is easier and more widely available. But this work must be done in parallel with efforts to continually investigate the social, political, and economic instability that can often exasperate so many of our friends and neighbors—our children, educators, health care workers, and underserved populations.

Across Essex County, organizations are doing just that.

At the Integrated Center for Medical Group Visits, Dr. Geller is hiring a psychologist and a clinical social worker who will provide behavioral health services as part of the organization’s group model.

“Through group mental health services, more people can receive support and treatment than when there are only individual visits,” he said.

Salem-based nonprofit Lifebridge employs a Community Health Navigator who will address the lack of health care for homeless residents. Pettengill House in Salisbury is embarking on a similar programme. Beverly’s Northshore Education Consortium is expanding Connections, its full-service program for students and families experiencing substance abuse and mental health problems, to break away from the historical punitive impact on public schools. Greater Lynn Senior Services is developing programs within its Phoenix Food Hub to address the link between nutritional deficiencies and behavioral health. Each and every one of these nonprofits works with other organizations—schools, hospitals, communities, community health centers, businesses, and more—to strengthen a sustainable support system.

The Essex County Community Foundation has recently invested philanthropic dollars in these and other programs through our Behavioral Partnerships Grants Program, a funding partnership between ECCF’s COVID-19 Response Fund, the Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation, the Evelyn Lily Lutz Foundation, the North Shore Community Health Network and other anonymous donors. A total of nearly $600,000 in grants were awarded.

This winter, ECCF will launch a second round of Behavioral Health Partnership grants in partnership with the North Shore Community Health Network and Congressman Seth Moulton. This new round of funding will specifically address behavioral health workforce issues and its design is the result of continued learning and testing of an evolving system.

Our goal with all of these grants is to encourage the collaboration that is critical to making innovative, lasting changes in local behavioral health systems—changes that not only expand immediate access to care, but also take shape in organizations that are also addressing issues of poverty, hunger, homelessness and other injustices that affect the health of thousands of Essex County residents.

And in Essex County, there is a desire to do this work together. A recent Behavioral Health Think Lab hosted by the ECCF brought together 120 stakeholders – all eager to network, devise collaborative solutions and form cross-sector partnerships that will ultimately fill the gaps in a system that currently fails to provide equitable care.

That silver lining—that willingness to come together—suggests that the time is right for change. As public discourse continues to simultaneously legitimize and destigmatize mental health, we must continue to harness the strength and power that comes with working together. Share your ideas. Representation of interests for federal, state and municipal funding. Support the work of non-profit organizations and organizations seeking equitable solutions. Spread the word about new opportunities for funding and collective action.

Together we can create the care system that Essex County needs and deserves.

Carol Lavoie Schuster is ECCF Vice President for Programs and Community Services. Michelle Xiarhos Curran is the Foundation’s communications writer.

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A 12th grade girl from Pulwama raises awareness about menstrual hygiene and mental health https://howtousehypnosis.com/a-12th-grade-girl-from-pulwama-raises-awareness-about-menstrual-hygiene-and-mental-health/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 16:03:49 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/a-12th-grade-girl-from-pulwama-raises-awareness-about-menstrual-hygiene-and-mental-health/ Seher Mir, a 17-year-old 12th grader from Pampore in Pulwama, is raising awareness of two taboo subjects, mental health and menstruation. As part of her campaign, she runs awareness campaigns in government schools and among women in rural areas. As part of her campaign, she runs awareness campaigns in government schools and among women in […]]]>

Seher Mir, a 17-year-old 12th grader from Pampore in Pulwama, is raising awareness of two taboo subjects, mental health and menstruation. As part of her campaign, she runs awareness campaigns in government schools and among women in rural areas.

As part of her campaign, she runs awareness campaigns in government schools and among women in rural areas. Andleb-i-Firdous, also known as “ZOON”, is a non-profit youth organization whose seeds were sown by Seher Mir in October 2021.

The organization works to raise awareness of menstruation and mental health by honoring important landmarks and their people.

The main goal of the organization is to instill the values ​​of women’s health, menstrual hygiene management and sanitation in rural girls and women.

Her determination had a domino effect and what started as a single person’s idea grew into a team of 50 like-minded teenagers.

Speaking to ANI, Sehar Mir said: “When we talk about Kashmir, women are most targeted and isolated when they accept the menstrual cycle as a natural phenomenon and openly talk about menstruation and related issues. They are unaware of safe menstrual hygiene practices and sustainable menstrual solutions.”

“The majority of rural Kashmiri women still use dirty clothes as absorbents during their periods for many reasons. One of the main reasons for not using hygiene products during your period is shyness. They are ashamed to buy sanitary napkins. We started at the birthplace of an important Kashmiri figure, Habba Khatun. At her birthplace, Chandhara, we run many menstrual health initiatives to provide accessible menstrual products while educating young girls about menstrual health and hygiene,” she said.

She said they run awareness campaigns not only on menstruation and mental health, but also on climate change and economic stability.

“We also raise awareness in state schools. Our focus is now to move to private schools as well. She said. I started with my own pocket money but ended up starting a fundraiser and raising about 50,000. Then aside from that, I have a few people who voluntarily donate money to the organization,” she said.

“Over time, Andleb-i-Firdous, commonly referred to as ZOON, has broadened its reach and is currently addressing not only mental health and menstruation, but also issues such as climate change and economic stability in its awareness campaigns. The campaigns are characterized by the spread of sanitary napkins at the end,” she continued.

Additionally, ZOON’s Instagram handle @andleb_i_firdous addresses a range of mental disorders, menstrual and hygiene, and sexual abuse, Sehar said.

According to Sehar Mir, since the establishment of the “Zoon”, 50 unpaid volunteers from the NGO have managed to carry out awareness campaigns in remote areas such as Pattan Baramulla, Mirgund Baramulla, Chandhara Pampore, Shar Shali Pampore, Laltrag Pampore and Zfrage Pulwama Many other backward villages of Kashmir give theirs Share knowledge to over 600 students and distribute more than 10,000 free sanitary napkins among them.

She said they have received recognition for their work from the authorities and are quickly gaining recognition through their Instagram name.

“There are very few student-run organizations in Kashmir. This is mainly due to the social pressure not to go in these directions and to concentrate only on studies. I was a person who always wanted to make people aware of the stereotypes that existed in our society and to actually help people,” she said.

“By starting this organization I was able to reach people and finally started to do what I had wanted for a very long time. The best part was the feedback I got from the students, which made our team even more motivated,” she added.

She further explained the stigmatic situation in the country regarding menstrual problems.

“According to a study, 88% of menstruating women in India use homemade alternatives such as old fabrics, while 63 million adolescent girls live without toilet facilities. Ignorance, poverty and neglect are the main reasons for poor menstrual hygiene,” she said.

“Even in this day and age, conversations about topics like mental health and menstrual health are often avoided. Especially in rural areas, where even the first waves of modernization have not yet arrived, this has had devastating, albeit expected, consequences. The ignorant masses have highly stigmatized issues that need to be addressed as a matter of priority,” she said.

“I have some classmates of core members of my zoon namely Nuha Masood (DPS), a 12th grade student, Ahmad Wani (DPS), a 12th grade student, and Fayiez Rafiq (Burnhall), a 12th grade student . In such a scenario, raising awareness becomes the most important first step against stigma,” she added. (ANI)

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