Mental Health Awareness – How To Use Hypnosis http://howtousehypnosis.com/ Mon, 05 Jul 2021 20:50:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://howtousehypnosis.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Mental Health Awareness – How To Use Hypnosis http://howtousehypnosis.com/ 32 32 What does it take to get more of us into therapy? https://howtousehypnosis.com/what-does-it-take-to-get-more-of-us-into-therapy/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/what-does-it-take-to-get-more-of-us-into-therapy/#respond Mon, 05 Jul 2021 17:30:29 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/what-does-it-take-to-get-more-of-us-into-therapy/ Getty Aside from July being a month to take a vacation, fire off fireworks on Independence Day, and face the rising temperatures, July is also the perfect time of year for women and men to take stock of their health – especially mental health – do. July is actually Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental […]]]>


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Aside from July being a month to take a vacation, fire off fireworks on Independence Day, and face the rising temperatures, July is also the perfect time of year for women and men to take stock of their health – especially mental health – do.

July is actually Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental illness rates among black people are comparable to those in the rest of the population, but we often lack access to adequate care. According to a 2017 survey by Psychiatry.org, only one in three African American people who need mental health services actually get them.

But that doesn’t mean we should stop getting them. With this in mind, we worked with Dr. Angela Diaz of the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center in New York, which provides free comprehensive health care for young people between the ages of 10 and 24, spoke about this important topic and time of year. Here’s what she had to say about the importance of mental health services being more relocatable, sensitive, and overall more accessible.

MadameNoire: A lot of people these days will say that young people seem more depressed these days and there are a lot more cases of suicide. Would you say that’s true? If so, why does this happen more often than in the past?

Dr. Angela Diaz: I think it’s true. I think it’s a very complex subject. I think young people have stressful lives, sometimes a lot of conflicts with their peers, family. Many of them have a history of childhood trauma, sexual abuse, physical abuse, or other types of abuse. Also, seeing on television, especially children of color, that they are portrayed in very negative ways doesn’t help. The number of suicides has risen to about 64 percent in the past decade, and that happens across the country. I think it’s really tedious for kids and especially for kids with color.

Do you think the mixed news on social media plays a role in any way?

I would say youth in general, but especially young people of color are often portrayed very negatively in all forms of media. You keep seeing young people who look like themselves get killed and called criminals and all that stuff. I think that contributes to that. The other thing that contributes to this, and why I think there are some differences, is that poor people in general, and people of color in particular, do not have access to mental health services. In New York City, for example, class and race often go together. This leads to a real lack of access to medical care.

With this in mind, how important is it that the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center and similar medical facilities offer free access to psychiatrists and psychotherapists? Therapy is very difficult to come by and very expensive, especially for young people who need it most.

There are very few services. These services are not intended for young people. And then you need to have insurance or money to pay for your service. This is generally the case. And even if you have insurance or money to pay for, sometimes there isn’t enough capacity or services to meet demand. And most young people with a mental health need are actually missing out on the services they so desperately need. That is why we have the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center. We believe that young people have a right to have their needs met, be it physical health or sexual and reproductive health or mental health, dental health, optical health. They really have a right to the services they urgently need. And since 70 percent of the young people who come here have no insurance at all, we make these services free because we don’t want any barriers. You can come from anywhere. You must be between 10 and 22 years old to enter the program. You can stay until you turn 24. We offer MetroCards and sometimes we buy their medication because we really want them to be fine.

Black people are often very dependent on our trust in the faith and the church. When you feel down, people say, “Just go to church and pray about it.” Do you feel that this has helped or hurt people trying to obtain necessary services?

I think belief is very important in the black community and other communities and I think it plays a constant role. The thing is that there aren’t enough services. But one role that the church or places of worship can play is to make it more natural for people to choose mental health. If they have a problem that they are depressed about, the Church can help remove the stigma around it. It would be helpful to say, “Mental health is very important. When you feel depressed, you should get services. ”But I think even if people want services, there aren’t enough. I think that’s the main problem. Until we get more, I think we need to find a good way to deal with the stigma because young people are unlikely to go to a psychiatric program and correctly say, “I am depressed or suicidal.” It just doesn’t happen. But people are more likely to come to primary care because they need a medical exam, have a cold, or think they are pregnant. When you have a primary or primary care service, clinicians who understand young people and can recognize depression, those needs can be met. So what we are doing here with the youth health center is that psychologists, social workers, child and youth psychiatrists work with a doctor in primary care. I am a trained doctor. So when I see a young person and see that they are depressed or have a history of childhood sexual abuse, that same day, on the same visit, I get a mental health person to meet them about these issues. It is not, “I will refer you to mental health or another visit.” We just have to just do it. No stigma or judgment. It’s only part of what you need. It’s only part of your health. Simply more natural and part of the well-being.

Would you say that race plays a role in access to mental health services? That’s a big part of the discussion when it comes to many other health inequalities – maternal and infant mortality rates, and even just the treatment we receive for serious illnesses.

I would generally say yes. One reason I mentioned is that there are people with color who are less likely to be insured, but even if they have insurance, the services are usually not culturally relevant and sensitive. For young people they are not suitable for young people, they are designed to be youth-friendly. So if you don’t have services for that particular demographic, they probably won’t come. Or there are people who make it difficult for these people to get them because when you call they say, “We have a week to wait.” If they weren’t motivated to begin with, then after four weeks they are or have not been motivated dealing with a major crisis or they killed themselves. God only knows. I think the problem is the design of the services and the fact that there are not enough. The existing ones are not made population specific. They make it to the population not easy to get into the country and provide culturally relevant services that understand the specific population they serve, so there is absolutely a discrepancy based on class, based on race, based on gender – like the gay -lesbian and transgender youth. It is not easy for them to get the services they need. And when you are poor and black and part of the LGBT community, these things intensify. And then these young people are not doing well unless they get the services they need. But when they get the services they need and people really know how to work with them, then they do it wonderfully.

What can people outside of professional care do to manage their mental health and that of the people they care about?

Have a communication style that helps young people open up and share more, in a way that doesn’t make them feel like they are being criticized. Talk to people who accept you and make sure that people feel connected and that people care for them. And make sure they are not isolated. The worst thing for a person, especially a young person, is feeling lonely and isolated. Also meditation and yoga. This connection of mind and body. To dance. Doing things that are physical exercise, eating healthy, eating healthy. And just being part of a family, being part of a unit helps you feel valued. I think these things are all important, but if a person needs psychological help they should also be able to get professional mental health services.

We also need to be comfortable saying, “I’m depressed so I might need help.” And when you see someone you know and they don’t eat as usual and don’t seem to care, say something . Say, “You seem downcast. What’s going on? “It could be a long way. You can eventually help connect them to services. But just being there, being a helping hand, being an ear to listen to them, that helps. Trying to Relieving stress and creating a more positive environment is very helpful for communities everywhere.



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Inside Housing – Insight – The pandemic and mental health: what are the next steps for building a wellness strategy? https://howtousehypnosis.com/inside-housing-insight-the-pandemic-and-mental-health-what-are-the-next-steps-for-building-a-wellness-strategy/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/inside-housing-insight-the-pandemic-and-mental-health-what-are-the-next-steps-for-building-a-wellness-strategy/#respond Mon, 05 Jul 2021 07:46:44 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/?p=637 Sponsored by HomeLINK A discussion hosted by Inside Housing, in association with HomeLINK, explores the lessons learned over the past year and how they should guide wellness strategies moving forward. Illustration by Neil Webb Sharelines Research by @MindCharity found 1 in 3 social housing residents experience mental health issues. An @InsideHousing roundtable explores the lessons learned […]]]>


Sponsored by HomeLINK

A discussion hosted by Inside Housing, in association with HomeLINK, explores the lessons learned over the past year and how they should guide wellness strategies moving forward. Illustration by Neil Webb

Sharelines


Research by @MindCharity found 1 in 3 social housing residents experience mental health issues. An @InsideHousing roundtable explores the lessons learned over the past year and how they should guide a wellness strategy (sponsored) @Aico_Limited #UKHousing


“It’s crucial for social landlords to think about the relationship we have with our staff, residents and the NHS and other mental health services,” says @AndrewvanDoorn @HACThousing (sponsored) #UKhousing


“Are your operatives aware and being proactive in regard to engaging with residents who might have mental health issues, do they know what to look for and how to report it, asks Andy Sturgess @Aico_Limited (sponsored) #UKhousing


In association with:

A discussion hosted by Inside Housing, in association with HomeLINK, explores the lessons learned over the past year and how they should guide wellness strategies moving forward. Illustration by Neil Webb

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought to the fore the nation’s mental health challenge. Thousands of people across the country have had to navigate through multiple lockdowns, which have caused prolonged isolation, loneliness and fear.

Social housing was no exception, with the pandemic exacerbating the issue. Of course, mental health was on the radar before the pandemic. A 2018 study of the sector by mental health charity Mind, for example, found that one in three social housing residents experiences mental health issues.

Against this backdrop, Inside Housing hosted a virtual roundtable during last month’s Mental Health Awareness Week. The discussion aimed to find out from providers what they have seen and learned over the past year –
and how that might inform wellness strategies.

Kick-starting the discussion, Inside Housing editor Martin Hilditch asks participants to reflect on the past year, including how the pandemic might shape their well-being and mental health strategies.



A worsening crisis

“We haven’t yet felt the full impact of the year that’s gone by,” says Andrew van Doorn, chief executive of HACT, as he explains that while mental health has always featured in conversations in the sector, the pandemic has made this issue far more acute for tenants and staff.

Mr van Doorn suggests that bearing this in mind in the sector’s future approach is vitally important – and that it is crucial for social landlords “to think about the relationship we have with our staff, the people in our homes, with other organisations… and with the NHS and mental health services”.

Sam Scharf, director of communities and sustainability at Orbit: “One phone call [to residents] isn’t enough”

Sam Scharf, director of communities and sustainability at Orbit: “One phone call [to residents] isn’t enough”

Jon Foster, director of service development at Metropolitan Thames Valley Housing (MTVH), spells out just how serious the situation is. He says that over the past nine months there has been “a real peak” in the number of attempted and actual suicides in some of the landlord’s general needs estates in north London.

This highlights the challenge that residents and staff face – and MTVH is exploring what its crisis response support should look like moving forward, he says.

Jen Davis-Dean, head of retirement living at Housing 21, which specialises in care for older people, says that the pandemic has brought into focus the need for concerted action. “The impact of the past year for everyone has been huge… but particularly on older people. The loneliness that many people have felt has been exacerbated for many older people living alone.

“Digital inclusion is often less among that group, so they’ve been even more isolated. Then, there’s also the cognitive and physical decline and the mental health issues that come from those lengthy periods of isolation and inactivity.”

Digital inclusion and upskilling were challenges that Lorraine Lawson, head of operations for mental health at Look Ahead, had to address with her team.

Look Ahead offers support services including mental health, homelessness and learning difficulty support.

She says: “During [the pandemic] we were extremely busy. We were training up our customers in how to use smartphones, we delivered netbooks to all of our services, we set up virtual meetings with social services and mental health teams because we found that we were one of the only mental health services that were still meeting with our customers during that period.”

James Hudson, assistant director of commercial strategy and growth at Your Homes Newcastle, says that “the digital revolution” has enabled his organisation to connect with tenants on a different level.

“I don’t think we’ve ever been closer to our customers as we are now, because we’re living the same life; we’re doing everything virtually. So I wanted to make sure that as an organisation we were capitalising on that and getting as close to the tenants as we possibly could because we were sharing their experiences in a way that we probably never have done.”

Maggie Houghton, programme manager at Hyde: “I’m quite optimistic that there are ways [to collect data on how services impact residents] that don’t conflict with business needs”

Maggie Houghton, programme manager at Hyde: “I’m quite optimistic that there are ways [to collect data on how services impact residents] that don’t conflict with business needs”

Mr Hudson led on his organisation’s COVID-19 response and says he has seen first-hand the impact of the pandemic on the mental health of its 30,000 tenants and 2,000 members of staff.

“As a sector we seem to be becoming a lot less transactional and a lot more human and I think this happened so much more during the pandemic,” he says – a point that was met with several nodding heads.

But Sam Scharf, director of communities and sustainability at Orbit, says there is still work to be done to “move us from that transactional position”.

He explains how his organisation carried out between 15,000 and 18,000 well-being calls to its residents during the pandemic, which he says has “shown us the value of what it could look like if we build trust with our residents”. But he stresses how “one phone call isn’t enough” and that organisations should be making more regular meaningful connections with their residents.

Engaging at every level

From here the discussion moves to the importance of community and staff engagement to successfully boost well-being and mental health.

Aileen Evans, chief executive of Grand Union Housing Group and president of the Chartered Institute of Housing, says that as a starting point to building a wellness strategy, organisations should first communicate with residents and staff to find out what they want and then work out how to deliver it.

In terms of staff, she says that “what we did at Grand Union was say to our colleagues, ‘how would you like to be communicated with and how would you like us to support you?’, rather than thinking, ‘here’s the way we’re going to do it and here’s what you’re getting’”.

As a result, the association organised homeschooling, set up a ‘wall of kindness’ where people could share hopeful stories, and ran well-being groups.

At MTVH, the team has been using targeted community projects to upskill residents to provide better frontline support within its general needs homes.

“Examples of that could be on one estate where we’re seeing a particular increase in mental health needs in a housing context, but we can’t find the community support around that estate that we’d like to link in with,” Mr Foster says. “So in Brent, we’ve done some work to upskill a whole group of residents on one estate to become mental health first aiders. That has been our starting point but now [we want to] help residents bed those skills into their lives and communities so they can make that long-term difference.”

Andy Sturgess, regional specification manager at Aico and smart homes technology supplier at HomeLINK, offers an interesting viewpoint on engagement, given that his business does a lot of work to train housing association operatives, such as engineers and installers. He says: “We’re looking to push the message out from our end. We have a lot of engagement with housing associations at the operative end and as we’ve heard from this roundtable there is a top-end approach. You’ve got key messages you want to develop as an organisation, but is it actually getting pushed out through your frontline operatives? Are they aware and being proactive in regard to engaging with residents, and from a mental health perspective do they know what to look for? Do they know how to report it?”

Lisa Voyle, senior project officer at association Newydd, responds by noting the importance of working with partners to deliver better mental health services.

She says: “Our partnership working over the past year has worked really well. We’ve worked with Cwm Taf Health Board and Cardiff and Vale Health Board as well to deliver interventions to the point where these health boards have actually commissioned us to deliver services for them. One of the benefits of COVID-19 is the partnerships that have come from it. We’re all sharing services and knowledge, and there’s been less duplication in the area.”

Tracking outcomes

The discussion takes a different turn when Nick O’Shea, chief economist at the Centre for Mental Health, sets a challenge. He details research that forecasts a doubling of mental health service demand over the next five years. Despite this, he says the government is still sceptical about the severity of the problem and urges the sector to build up data to help demonstrate this.

He notes a similar problem when presenting research to the NHS: “There’s a sense that if someone is high need all you can do is put them into the different services and hope for the best but what I hear from housing providers is that you can help people get sustained improvement to their lives… but you’ve got to show it and that means tracking it over a much longer period of time, even when they’ve left your service.”

This challenge resonates with the panel members. Ms Evans says that the sector needs to think of putting a mechanism in place to support that.

Sheila Maxwell, community investment officer at Link Group, says that her organisation has begun to look into how they can track certain residents who have been through their ‘Better than Well’ service, which includes a series of cognitive behavioural therapy sessions.

Sheila Maxwell, community investment officer at Link Group: “[Anecdotal evidence] starts to turn into hard financial proxies that we can then use to build evidence of the broader impact of the service”

Sheila Maxwell, community investment officer at Link Group: “[Anecdotal evidence] starts to turn into hard financial proxies that we can then use to build evidence of the broader impact of the service”

“We also hope to track [residents] on a longer-term basis by getting access to community health index numbers for the individuals involved, anonymised. So that means we would be able to look at things and then follow up from the anecdotal side, [and demonstrate] social return on investment… for example, if people were saying, ‘I don’t use nearly as much meds as I used to’, or ‘I’ve only been to my GP twice this year’. These sorts of things start to turn into hard financial proxies that we can then use to build evidence of the broader impact of the service.”

Maggie Houghton, programme manager at Hyde, adds: “I’m quite optimistic that there are ways of doing this that don’t conflict with business needs and bottom-line pressures, but a lot of it starts with having really good data and systems for capturing the impact of the work we do in a systematic way.”

Participants

Participants

Martin Hilditch
Editor, Inside Housing (chair)

Jen Davis-Dean
Head of retirement living, Housing 21

Aileen Evans
Chief executive, Grand Union Housing Group; and president, Chartered Institute of Housing

Jon Foster
Director of service development, Metropolitan Thames Valley Housing

Maggie Houghton
Programme manager, Hyde

James Hudson
Assistant director of commercial strategy and growth, Your Homes Newcastle

Lorraine Lawson
Head of operations, Look Ahead

Sheila Maxwell
Community investment officer, Link Group

Nick O’Shea
Chief economist, Centre for Mental Health

Sam Scharf
Director of communities and sustainability, Orbit

Andy Sturgess
Regional specification manager, Aico; and smart homes technology supplier, HomeLINK

Andrew van Doorn
Chief executive, HACT

Lisa Voyle
Senior project officer, Newydd

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Don Davey Finishes Race Across America for Veterans Mental Health https://howtousehypnosis.com/don-davey-finishes-race-across-america-for-veterans-mental-health/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/don-davey-finishes-race-across-america-for-veterans-mental-health/#respond Fri, 02 Jul 2021 00:28:07 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/don-davey-finishes-race-across-america-for-veterans-mental-health/ The Times Union | Florida Times-Union Original Jaguars defensive lineman Don Davey finished his cross-country quest at Race Across America. Davey’s team completed the journey in six days and 13 hours, finishing first in the 8-person mixed category of the grueling bike race that stretched from Oceanside, California to Annapolis, Maryland. His team raised more […]]]>


Original Jaguars defensive lineman Don Davey finished his cross-country quest at Race Across America.

Davey’s team completed the journey in six days and 13 hours, finishing first in the 8-person mixed category of the grueling bike race that stretched from Oceanside, California to Annapolis, Maryland.

His team raised more than $ 150,000 for the ONE MILE Leadership Project, which runs mental health support and awareness programs with a special focus on military veterans.

“Taking part in the Race Across America is one of the hardest things I’ve ever done, but also one of the most rewarding,” said Davey. “My teammates and my crew were incredibly positive, optimistic and supportive from start to finish. Best of all, we’ve raised over $ 150,000 to support the brave men and women in our military who protect the freedoms we all enjoy. “

The 53-year-old Davey played parts of eight seasons in the NFL, the first four with the Green Bay Packers from 1991 to 1994 and the last four with the newly formed Jaguars from 1995 to early 1998. He took six and a half sacks in 42 games Jacksonville and played for the Jaguars during the team’s debut season and in the post-1996 AFC Championship Game run.



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NFL players talk about mental health problems https://howtousehypnosis.com/nfl-players-talk-about-mental-health-problems/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/nfl-players-talk-about-mental-health-problems/#respond Wed, 30 Jun 2021 08:56:11 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/nfl-players-talk-about-mental-health-problems/ Darius Leonard was a 17-year-old high school football player who was focused on his dream of making it to the NFL when his closest brother was killed at the age of 19. The Indianapolis Colts linebacker says he fell into a dark blur after his death, which affected him not only mentally but also physically. […]]]>


Darius Leonard was a 17-year-old high school football player who was focused on his dream of making it to the NFL when his closest brother was killed at the age of 19. The Indianapolis Colts linebacker says he fell into a dark blur after his death, which affected him not only mentally but also physically. He lost weight and struggled with anxiety, depression, and panic attacks.

“I fought, I fought for a long time and then I had to go to advice,” says Leonard. “I just feel like the more you talk about it, the freer you can be.”

Leonard says he turned to poetry to help him get through the difficult times and relied on the strength of his family and friends until he was strong enough to fight back on his own. “It’s okay not to be okay,” he muses. “This thing we’re going through, life, isn’t perfect. There are so many times that you face so many obstacles and you feel like the world is against you, but you have to keep fighting, keep fighting and never give up. “

Now he and other NFL players are sharing their stories as part of the Indianapolis Colts’ effort to “kick the stigma”. The initiative focuses on raising awareness of mental disorders and removing the shame and stigma they say are all too often associated with these diseases, while also raising money for nonprofits working in work in education, support and mental health advocacy.

“Fighting the stigma is our commitment to rooting out and changing this environment,” says Colts owner Jim Irsay. “Fighting the stigma is our call to all of our brothers and sisters to fight this thing. It is our reason to give hope to change the environment and the disease that lives around us will have no place if you have the boots on the ground if you want to attack the stigma and remove it so people can seek help and get well. “

A Kicking the Stigma virtual fundraiser this spring raised $ 4.5 million to distribute to Indiana-based nonprofits that either provide mental illness treatment or mental health awareness services.

The Colts hosted a round table discussion to highlight the struggles and triumphs of NFL players battling mental health issues, hosted by TV host Carson Daly. Daly talked about his own struggles with mental health, including a panic attack during a live show in the early 2000s. “I am one of the tens of millions of people who have silently suffered with mental health,” says Daly. “I didn’t know then, but for decades I thought I was broken and was finally getting therapy.”

The round table discussion included Leonard, Las Vegas Raiders Defensive Tackle Solomon Thomas, Atlanta Falcons tight end Hayden Hurst and Raiders tight end Darren Waller. “The biggest thing we can do is talk and be vulnerable,” says Thomas. “Then we connect with someone. We are all human, we will have ups and downs in life, but it’s important to talk about it.”

As the Colts work to select which charities will benefit from their first Kick the Stigma fundraiser, Thomas hopes the discussion it sparked will spur people who fight like he used to for help search. “I know that I’m not the only one,” says Thomas. “Every time I tell my story, I realize that I’m not the only one who’s been through something like this.” By opening up, he says, “You never know who else it will help.”

Categories: Education, Mental Health Awareness, Celebrities | Keywords:

Kim Lucey is a freelance journalist with over a decade of experience in the field. Her career has included coverage of major news events such as the Sandy Hook School shooting, the Watertown, MA lockdown after the Boston bombings, and Superstorm Sandy. Her in-depth reports have won awards, including an emphasis on treating mental health problems in children. She is currently a reporter for a television broadcaster that covers the news across the Greater Boston Area with an appreciation for fact finding and storytelling. Follow Kim on Facebook and Twitter.



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This therapy helps Selena Gomez deal with mental health problems https://howtousehypnosis.com/this-therapy-helps-selena-gomez-deal-with-mental-health-problems/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/this-therapy-helps-selena-gomez-deal-with-mental-health-problems/#respond Tue, 29 Jun 2021 12:50:41 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/this-therapy-helps-selena-gomez-deal-with-mental-health-problems/ At 28, Selena Gomez spent a lot of time in the spotlight. With 240 million followers on Instagram, she is one of the biggest pop stars in the world. But the road to fame wasn’t a smooth road as one might think. She has mastered her fair share of health problems on her path to […]]]>


At 28, Selena Gomez spent a lot of time in the spotlight. With 240 million followers on Instagram, she is one of the biggest pop stars in the world. But the road to fame wasn’t a smooth road as one might think. She has mastered her fair share of health problems on her path to success. And the award-winning singer has never shied away from talking about mental health. She has been campaigning for mental health problems for two years. She talked about her diagnosis of bipolar disorder and how she used therapy to deal with her problems. Read also – Mandala Coloring: A Meditation Technique To Fend Off Stress And Anxiety

With her mission-driven beauty company Rare Beauty, Gomez launched a new Mental Health 101 awareness campaign in honor of Mental Health Awareness Month 2021. The initiative is dedicated to “supporting mental health education and promoting financial support for more mental health services in educational institutions,” according to its Instagram. The singer “Kill ’em with kindness” is often seen speaking to doctors and organizing live chats with well-known celebrities to raise awareness about mental health. Read Also – Looking Back at BTS Talking About Depression; Know how the Bangtan Boys coped with it

Selena Gomez talks about mental health

The ‘Lose You To Love Me’ singer spoke about her mental health journey in a recent interview with Vogue Australia and revealed that she studied Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). In the interview, the singer continued to talk about her belief in medication and what advice she will give to others. “I never want to be a person who says, ‘I have medication, it’s okay now.’ I believe in medication, of course, in therapy – I did all of these things to make myself better. But my advice won’t be, ‘Oh, you’ll get over it.’ It’s actually an everyday practice, ”she said. Read Also – Shilpa Shetty Asks People To “Be Kind” Amid Mental Health Crisis

“And as I said, I also go to therapy. You can find ways to live in it. But as soon as you understand it, the fear that you will admit that you have something disappears. “

What is Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)?

DBT is a form of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Its main goals are to educate people on how to live in the now, build healthy stress coping mechanisms, manage their emotions, and improve their interpersonal connections. In other words, it helps one identify and change negative thought patterns and urges positive behavior changes. DBT was created to help people who were suicidal or who had borderline personality disorder. However, it has been adapted for various mental health issues that threaten a person’s safety, relationships, employment, and emotional well-being. Here is where the techniques and treatments using Dialectical Behavior Therapy can help:

  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Borderline personality disorder
  • Bipolar disorder
  • eating disorder
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Non-suicidal self-harm
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Substance use disorder
  • Suicidal behavior
  • depression

Published: June 29, 2021 18:20 | Updated: June 29, 2021 6:35 p.m.




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Blades of Steel: Johns Highlights Mental Health in Hockey | National news https://howtousehypnosis.com/blades-of-steel-johns-highlights-mental-health-in-hockey-national-news/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/blades-of-steel-johns-highlights-mental-health-in-hockey-national-news/#respond Sun, 27 Jun 2021 20:17:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/blades-of-steel-johns-highlights-mental-health-in-hockey-national-news/ This type of help is needed based on research conducted among Olympic and college athletes. Trent Petrie, professor and director of the Center for Sports Psychology at the University of North Texas, said elite athletes “report levels of depression, anxiety, substance use and sleep disorders comparable to, and in some cases higher than, levels of […]]]>


This type of help is needed based on research conducted among Olympic and college athletes. Trent Petrie, professor and director of the Center for Sports Psychology at the University of North Texas, said elite athletes “report levels of depression, anxiety, substance use and sleep disorders comparable to, and in some cases higher than, levels of the general population.”

“While we used to think that athletes were protected from such mental health problems and mental health problems, right now we are seeing with this younger generation – Generation Z and young millennials – that they actually have higher levels of mental health problems than we do in general See population, ”said Petrie.

Osaka, Phelps, Durant and others brought these things to light in other sports. In ice hockey, John’s story of concussions and head trauma adds another layer to the problem, with prominent voices like Hall of Fame goalkeeper Ken Dryden advocating punishing any form of head contact, even if it’s unintentional.

“When you talk about the effects of a concussion or head trauma, we know that there is such a thing as post-concussive syndrome and we know that this physical trauma can have emotional effects,” said Gunter. “We need to be more conscious of taking care of everything at all times, rather than separating a physical injury from an emotional concern.”



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For Pets’ Sake Event helps local animal shelters and raises mental health awareness https://howtousehypnosis.com/for-pets-sake-event-helps-local-animal-shelters-and-raises-mental-health-awareness/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/for-pets-sake-event-helps-local-animal-shelters-and-raises-mental-health-awareness/#respond Sat, 26 Jun 2021 01:07:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/for-pets-sake-event-helps-local-animal-shelters-and-raises-mental-health-awareness/ The event helped raise around 500 toys, pounds 2,000 of groceries, and $ 3,000 in cash donations June 25, 2021 7:07 PM Tyler job Posted: June 25, 2021 7:07 PM Updated: June 25, 2021 11:40 p.m. ONALASKA, Wis. (WKBT) – During the pandemic, many of us realized just how much our pets really do for […]]]>


The event helped raise around 500 toys, pounds 2,000 of groceries, and $ 3,000 in cash donations

ONALASKA, Wis. (WKBT) – During the pandemic, many of us realized just how much our pets really do for us.

Veterans also know the importance of helping out with PTSD.

A West Salem business owner thought it was time to do something for our furry companions and he came up with the idea for pets on Friday. It helps the Coulee Region Humane Society and the La Crosse County K-9 Unit.

When something gets your attention, sometimes you feel the need to do something about it.

“We happened to pull up to buy some other products that we had to buy from Farm & Fleet,” said Brian Ferris, who donated dog food. “And we saw the signs and I thought it was a good idea … these animals need the help.”

The event is a partnership between News 8 Now, Blain’s Farm & Fleet, and Noble Custom Woodshop to help the humane society and La Crosse County’s K-9 unit.

“It’s been pretty good so far,” said Daniel Noble, owner of Noble Custom Woodshop. “We got a lot of donations”

This includes pet food, toys, and cash.

“If people keep showing up, we’ll run as late as we need to,” said Noble.

But Noble didn’t just help organize this event with donations.

“I did this in honor of a fallen vet who lost his battle with PTSD,” said Noble.

For those struggling out there, animals can also be your supporters.

“I was passionate about it with PTSD dogs and all of the other mental health dogs,” said Noble.

It is a thing that people have accepted through generosity.

“Many of them were animal advocates,” said Noble.

Proof that a simple idea can become something big for the community.

People donated about 500 pet toys, about 2,000 pounds of grocery, and $ 3,000 in monetary donations.



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Good Company: How Riser + Tread brings together mental health and exercise https://howtousehypnosis.com/good-company-how-riser-tread-brings-together-mental-health-and-exercise/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/good-company-how-riser-tread-brings-together-mental-health-and-exercise/#respond Thu, 24 Jun 2021 18:18:00 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/good-company-how-riser-tread-brings-together-mental-health-and-exercise/ Based near Boston, Riser + Tread helps young men take responsibility and move forward in their lives through a combination of therapy and coaching. “We differ in our expertise and focus on working with male mental health. We also know that boys, especially young people, often need and demand more than just an ear, ”says […]]]>


Based near Boston, Riser + Tread helps young men take responsibility and move forward in their lives through a combination of therapy and coaching.

“We differ in our expertise and focus on working with male mental health. We also know that boys, especially young people, often need and demand more than just an ear, ”says co-founder Jotham Busfeld. “You and your parents want concrete tools and strategies, steps you can take to make real changes in your life.”

Bringing more than 20 years of experience in men’s mental health, Riser + Tread was founded in 2019 by Busfield, a licensed independent clinical social worker, and Jon Cunha, a licensed mental health consultant. The duo believe a hybrid approach of therapy and coaching is ideal for young men who are stuck and need to build positive impulses. They have found that most are resistant to the traditional idea of ​​therapy and therefore find the concept of coaching more accessible.

“Men have historically been encouraged to follow the ‘men’s playbook’ that so many athletes refer to. … ‘Keep problems to yourself, suck them up, deal with them yourself, be strong and stoic and show no weakness, ”says Busfeld. “We’re promoting a new and smarter kind of strength, that of strength through vulnerability and mental health learning.”

Cunha was a three-time college All-American in athletics until an injury ended his pursuit of the Olympics. This experience led him to support others with similar challenges. Riser + Tread has carved out a niche for itself among athletes by viewing athletics as a window into mindset and mental fitness.

“The athletes we work with are used to working with a trainer. The role of a coach is to improve the game, provide feedback and support. Our role is the same, ”says Cunha. “The difference is that we strengthen the mind instead of strengthening the body.”

While many people across the age / gender spectrum have benefited from Riser + Tread’s services, they refer to the majority of their customers as “young boys” aged 9-25.

THE OBJECT

As with many service companies, business at Riser + Tread began to decline at the beginning of the pandemic. Staff realized that zoom sessions were likely not going to be productive for their young clients, so they reached out to parents in the community to see how they could help in new ways.

This led to the creation of YouTube videos with helpful information for parents on topics like how to use video games, sleep hygiene, and how to encourage their children to seek help when they are struggling. Positive feedback on the videos led to the creation of The Grim Drive Podcast.

“I think the pandemic has forced us to get creative, to develop and get involved in the things we are great at, and to take some risks,” says Busfeld. “It has forced us to think outside the box, and that has resulted in growth as a company that we probably would not otherwise have seen.”

THE PRICE

Riser + Tread offers free consultations to prospective clients who recommend it as a great way to get fit before starting your progression path. Assessments are $ 275 and ongoing sessions are $ 175 per session. (The practice has three locations in the Boston area in Concord, Lexington, and Newton Upper Falls.) The podcast and YouTube videos are free to access.

DESCRIPTION

Born from the mental health effects of the pandemic, Cunha and Busfield used Riser + Tread’s therapy and coaching service, translating it onto The Grim Drive Podcast.

Each episode focuses on an athlete and a topic related to mental fitness, mental health, or mental illness. Over the past few years, notable professional athletes have shared more stories about their mental health journey, what they went through, and how they managed to assert themselves, reflecting a mental stigma that is continuing to dissipate in society.

With Cunha and Busfield as hosts, recent episodes included a look at Olympic Champion Simone Biles and Mental Fitness, NBA star Kevin Love and his struggles with anxiety, and retired NFL star Brandon Marshall’s story of living with borderline personality disorder . The first 30 to 40 episodes are recorded without guests so that Cunha and Busfield can rate the podcast before inviting athletes and coaches as guests.

“The podcast is a way for people to learn more about mental fitness, mental health and mental illness from a sport perspective,” says Busfield. “We want to do our part to further reduce the stigma associated with mental health by highlighting those athletes who have shown strength through vulnerability, who have spoken and spoken out.”

WHAT’S THE GOOD?

Riser + Tread is planning a nonprofit wing in its third year as a practice that will focus on a two-part mental health scholarship. One part focuses on design students and involves an architecture competition to design something with the mental health of the user in mind and the other part focuses on psychology / social work / counseling students and entrepreneurship and challenges applicants to design a business goal of mental health care to improve. The company will donate $ 10,000 to start this up and expects to attract sponsors.

WHAT’S NEXT

Riser + Tread plans to expand its athletic performance and recovery program, which, in addition to supporting the mental fitness development of athletes, also aims to help athletes return after injuries.

“When an athlete is injured, they are given the tools and support to restore their physical body. For example, if you sprained an ankle, see a physical therapist for recovery. However, the same level of automatism is not used to repair the mind after injury, ”says Cunha. “Too often we see athletes struggle emotionally when they lose their sport due to injury. This program is intended to support them both during the injury and to strengthen them for their return. ”

In addition to expanding the reach of the podcast, the Riser + Tread team wants to create a book and online program geared towards men’s mental fitness while also working with community organizations to promote mental health, education, awareness and improve parity in the health landscape.



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Ombudsman launches mental health program awareness campaign https://howtousehypnosis.com/ombudsman-launches-mental-health-program-awareness-campaign/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/ombudsman-launches-mental-health-program-awareness-campaign/#respond Wed, 23 Jun 2021 01:28:51 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/ombudsman-launches-mental-health-program-awareness-campaign/ A nationwide awareness campaign about a free, bespoke mental health support service for small business owners has begun as new research uncovered the emotional distress faced by small business owners over the past year. Australian Small Business and Family Business Ombudsman Bruce Billson says the awareness campaign will raise awareness of Beyond Blue’s New Access […]]]>


A nationwide awareness campaign about a free, bespoke mental health support service for small business owners has begun as new research uncovered the emotional distress faced by small business owners over the past year.

Australian Small Business and Family Business Ombudsman Bruce Billson says the awareness campaign will raise awareness of Beyond Blue’s New Access for Small Business Owners program, which offers free one-on-one meetings with specially trained mental health trainers.

“It’s important for small business owners to know that help is available when they need it,” says Billson.

New Access for Small Business Owners offers free one-on-one telemedicine calls with specially trained mental health coaches who provide evidence-based advice on stress management strategies.

“It is crucial that the New Access for Small Business Owners program is run by coaches who have experience in small businesses. It really helps to know that the person you are speaking to understands what it takes to run a small business.

“We know that many small business owners were hit hard during the pandemic, especially getting in and out of bans and restrictions, and that understandably has taken its toll.

“New research published by Xero found that nearly 7 in 10 (68%) of 500 small business owners surveyed reported that the past 12 months had been more emotionally draining than any other year they were in business.

“It also found that small business executives combined lost more than eight million hours of sleep each week due to the demands on running their small business. Troubled sleep can be a sign of stress.

“It’s important for small business owners to understand that taking care of their mental health can help their business too.

“Our My Business Health web portal is a great support tool for small business owners and connects to the New Access for Small Business Owners program while providing easy-to-read, practical tips on the day-to-day tasks of running a small business.”

Beyond Blue’s New Access program for small business owners is available now. Visit My Business Health at mybusinesshealth.gov.au

/ Public release. This material is from the original organization and can be punctiform, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here.



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Study shows differences in the brain in interpreting physical signals in mental disorders https://howtousehypnosis.com/study-shows-differences-in-the-brain-in-interpreting-physical-signals-in-mental-disorders/ https://howtousehypnosis.com/study-shows-differences-in-the-brain-in-interpreting-physical-signals-in-mental-disorders/#respond Tue, 22 Jun 2021 04:08:56 +0000 https://howtousehypnosis.com/study-shows-differences-in-the-brain-in-interpreting-physical-signals-in-mental-disorders/ Researchers have shown why people with mental disorders, including anorexia and panic disorder, perceive physical signals differently. The University of Cambridge researchers found that the part of the brain that interprets physical signals from the body behaves differently in people with a range of mental disorders, suggesting that it could be a target for future […]]]>


Researchers have shown why people with mental disorders, including anorexia and panic disorder, perceive physical signals differently.

The University of Cambridge researchers found that the part of the brain that interprets physical signals from the body behaves differently in people with a range of mental disorders, suggesting that it could be a target for future treatments.

The researchers examined “interoception” – the ability to sense internal states in the body – and whether there were common differences in the brain in people with mental disorders during this process. They found that a region of the brain called the dorsal central island showed varying levels of activity during interoception in a number of disorders, including depression, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and anxiety disorders.

Many people with mental disorders experience physical symptoms differently, be it an uncomfortable feeling of fullness with anorexia or the feeling of not having enough air with a panic disorder.

The results, reported in The American Journal of Psychiatry, show that activity in the dorsal center island could fuel these diverse interpretations of body sensations in mental health. Being more aware of the differences in the way people experience physical symptoms could also be helpful for those treating mental disorders.

We all use exteroception – seeing, smelling, hearing, tasting and feeling – to control our daily life. But interoception – the ability to interpret signals from our body – is essential for survival, even if this often happens unconsciously.

“Interoception is something we all do all the time, although we may not be aware of it,” said lead author Dr. Camilla Nord from the MRC Department of Cognitive and Brain Sciences. “For example, most of us are able to interpret the signals of low blood sugar like tiredness or irritability and know what to eat. However, there are differences in how our brain interprets these signals. ”

Differences in interoceptive processes have already been noted in people with eating disorders, anxiety and depression, panic disorders, addictions and other mental disorders. Theoretical models have shown that impaired cortical processing drives these changes in interoceptive processing and imparts susceptibility to a range of mental health symptoms.

Nord and her colleagues combined brain imaging data from previous studies and compared the differences in brain activity during interoception between 626 patients with mental disorders and 610 healthy controls. “We wanted to find out whether something similar was happening in the brain in people with different mental disorders, regardless of their diagnosis,” she says.

Their analysis showed that in patients with bipolar disorder, anxiety, major depression, anorexia, and schizophrenia, a part of the cerebral cortex called the dorsal central island showed a different brain activation in processing pain, hunger and other interoceptive signals compared to the control group.

The researchers then performed a follow-up analysis and found that the dorsal center island did not overlap with regions of the brain that were altered by antidepressants or psychological therapy, suggesting that it could be studied as a new target for future therapeutics in differences treat interoception.

“It is surprising that, despite the variety of psychological symptoms, there seems to be a common factor in how physical signals in mental disorders are processed differently by the brain,” said Nord. “It shows how closely physical and mental health are intertwined, but also the limits of our diagnostic system – some important factors of mental health could be ‘transdiagnostic’, that is, occur in many diagnoses.”

For the future, Dr. Nord studies to test whether this impaired activation could be changed by new treatments for mental disorders, such as brain stimulation.

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The research was supported by the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Center.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of press releases sent to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of information via the EurekAlert system.



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